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Ejuan Price lost for season with pectoral injury

Written by Sam Werner on .

News came out this morning that Pitt defensive end Ejuan Price will miss the entire 2014 season following surgery to repair a torn left pectoralis muscle. He was hurt during workouts this week and, according to a release from the school, was set to have surgery today.

This is just the latest in a string of tough-luck injuries for price. He missed the last seven games of last season with a back injury, and needed surgery on his right pectoral that kept him out of the entire 2012 season. In theory, Price will be almost certainly be able to apply for a medical redshirt following the 2015 season and get one more year (because he lost two full seasons due to injury).

For now, though the more immediate concern, from Pitt's perspective, is how to replace Price's unique contributions to the defense. He could line up with his hand in the ground or from a stand-up position and added a lot of versatility to a pass-rush that is trying to figure out how to replace the production of Aaron Donald. In the six games he played last year, Price had 23 tackles, including four tackles for loss and one sack.

Strictly from a depth chart perspective, this further weakens the Panthers at an already thin position. David Durham and Shakir Soto are the starters at defensive end, and Devin Cook is the only backup option with any sort of playing experience. Cook is coming off a knee injury that cost him most of last season, but played in all 13 games in 2012. He's shown flashes, but will probably have to be a somewhat consistent player for Pitt this season. Beyond that, redshirt freshman Luke Maclean will get a chance to carve out a role for himself. He backed up Soto at the strong-side spot during spring, but Price's injury might force him to move around a little bit on defense. The freshmen ends (Rori Blair, Shane Roy and Hez Trahan) might also get some cracks, with Blair having the inside track since he enrolled early and practiced with the team this spring.

In terms of filling Price's more specific niche as a stand-up rush end, the most likely scenario is that Nicholas Grigsby will take on that role. He did that towards the end of last season and during spring, so it was probably going to happen anyways, but this will mean plenty more snaps for him. I also wouldn't be surprised if Price's injury means Grigsby lines up as more of a traditional hand-down defensive end more frequently, too.

Finally, I actually don't think this news will change James Conner's role on the defense very much, if at all. Conner is a running back, first and foremost (and a good one, at that). Whatever role he plays on defense was always going to be determined by the workload he can physically handle, and that's still the case. Unless the coaching staff has a very different vision for Conner's future, I have a hard time believing they'd take a guy that ran for 799 yards as a true freshman and move him to the other side of the ball just to fill a numbers hole. He might have more of an opportunity to play some snaps based on Price's injury, but I don't think it means Conner will become a regular in the defensive end rotation.

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Zlobin: 'When you have one chance in overtime, you need to score' - 07-16-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

 

Anton Zlobin has a reputation he doesn't deserve.

Fairly or, probably more accurately, unfairly, any Russian hockey player is going to have a reputation of being flighty, aloof or enigmatic. Unfortunately, the mixed histories of superstars such as Ilya Kovalchuk, Ilya Bryzgalov Alexei Yashin and others have created a stigma for any Russian player.

Zlobin has another reputation he has more than earned.

He has shown to be a clutch player in postseason play. In the 2012 Memorial Cup Final, Zlobin scored in overtime to give the Shawinigan Cataractes 2-1 win against the London Knights.

Making his professional debut in 2013-14, Zlobin bounced between the AHL and ECHL during the regular season. In the postseason, Zlobin found a place on a line with Andrew Ebbett and Chuck Kobasew during the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins' run to the Eastern Conference final. Appearing in 15 playoff games, he scored 10 points, including six goals. Three of his goals were game-winning scores including an overtime goal in Game 1 of an Eastern Conference quarterfinal series against the Binghamton Senators:

A sixth-round pick in 2012, Zlobin is attending the NHL Penguins' prospect camp this week. Yesterday, he talked about his development, getting used to North America and being considered a clutch player.

How do you assess your first professional season?

"I guess it [went] pretty great. We had a great team. Great coaches. We make a conference final so it’s a pretty good experience for me for my first year in professional hockey."

Was it difficult bouncing between the AHL and ECHL throughout the season?

"I had an injury last year so I missed all the [offseason] camps and I just started to practice at the start of September. I understood I needed to be sent down for a little bit because I needed to come back to my conditioning [levels] and everything. I played pretty good in the [ECHL] and got called back. It’s helped me a lot."

You had a pretty successful individual run in the postseason.

"It’s always fun in the playoffs to play for something, to play for the Calder Cup. Everybody just sticks together. We have a fun time but at the same time it was a tough time. Every game, you play hard."

What was it like going from junior to professional hockey?

"Guys are a little bit smarter, stronger. It’s actually a big step for me from junior hockey to professional hockey right away. It was a tough time but [Wilkes-Barre/Scranton head coach John] Hynes helped me a lot for my conditioning and the system. When I understand the system, it’s easier to play the game."

What has it been like getting used to North America these past few seasons?

"My first year was pretty tough me. I can’t [figure out] any language. No French, no English. It was a pretty tough season for me. I just tried to figure out how to play there. When I got used to it and started to speak English, things [went] better."

Was are the difference between playing on a thinner North American rink versus the wider European rink?

"You have a little more time on a Russian rink. You have a little more time to make a play and every thing. Here [in North America], if you think more than one second, you’re going to get hit or something or miss the play or lose the puck."

Was it difficult to get used to a new culture and new language, especially in Quebec where French is the predominant language?

"Guys and coaches in the locker room tried to speak to me in English and my [billet] family was French. [They] started to learn English and teach me. Guys tried to teach me French words. I understand French words. After two years [in North America], I started to speak English better."

Have you ever considered playing in the KHL in your native Russia?

"No. No. It’s my dream to play in the NHL. Not many guys have a chance to play in the NHL right now. I’m lucky to be here and I’ll try to do my best to make the NHL."

What was it like playing on a line with Ebbett and Kobasew. Each of those guys, especially Kobasew, have spent a fair amount of time in the NHL.

"Oh, it’s a great experience for me. Those guys, it’s unbelievable. [Kobasew] helped me a lot to make a play and make points at the same time. W hen I did a wrong play, we watched the video together, the power-play video and [talked about] what we could do better."

Do you consider yourself a "clutch" player?

"I don’t know. I just tried to play my way. I’m a goal scorer I think so I try to score as many as I can. When you have one chance in overtime, you need to score."

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Empty Netter Assists - 07-16-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

Penguins

-Sidney Crosby (above) has opted against having surgery on his injured right wrist ... for now.

-The Penguins re-signed restricted free agent forward Bobby Fanham to a one-year two-way contract. Farnham, 25, appeared in 64 AHL games last season, scored 14 points (seven goals, seven assists) and recorded 144 penalty minutes.

-EN Says: Farnham would see to possess the qualities the Penguins have sought for their beleaguered bottom-six forwards. He's a tenacious skater who likes to hit and has chipped in a few points. But he tends to cross the line way too much. He's a five-minute major waiting to happen.

-How much of an opportunity do defensive prospects Brian Dumoulin and Scott Harrington really have?

-Forward prospect Dominik Uher wants to add some strength because "you have to have something behind those chirps."

-Mike Johnston speaks:

-Kasperi Kapanen speaks:

-Tristan Jarry speaks:

-The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins signed defenseman Alex Boak and Clark Seymour to one-year AHL contracts.

Neapolitan Ice Cream Metropolitan Division

-The Islanders re-signed restricted free agent forward Casey Cizikas to a two-year contract worth a total of $2 million. Coming off an entry-level contract with a salary cap hit of $793,333, Cizikas' new deal will have a cap hit of $1 million. Appearing in 80 games last season, Cizikas, 23, scored 16 points (six goals, 10 assists).

-EN Says: Cizikas is a tenacious fourth-liner who can chip in on the penalty kill. This deal is a bit of a bargain.

-The Islanders re-signed restricted free agent defenseman Calvin de Haan (right) to a three-year contract worth a total of $5.9 million. Coming off an entry-level contract with a salary cap hit of $870,000, de Haan's new deal will have a cap hit of $1,966,667. Appearing in 51 games last season, de Haan, 23, scored 16 points (three goals, 13 assists).

-EN Says: A first-round pick in 2009, de Haan is part of the the Islanders' future. He needs to take a big step forward next season in order to live up to this deal. He's a puck-moving defenseman who needs to learn the defensive side of the game at the NHL level.

-The Capitals signed forward Jakub Vrana, a first-round pick in this year's draft, and goaltender Vitek Vanecek, a second-round pick in this year's draft, to a three-year entry-level contract.

-The Blue Jackets re-signed restricted free agent defenseman Tim Erixon to a one-year contract worth a total of $600,000. Coming off an entry-level contract with a salary cap hit of $900,000, Erixon, 23, appeared in two games last season and had no points.

-EN Says: With the Blue Jackets trading away Nikita Nikitin this offseason, there should be room at the NHL level for Erixon to land a role at the NHL level.

-The Devils re-signed restricted free agent forward Jacob Josefson. Financial terms were not reported.

-The Hurricanes hired former Flames assistant David Marcoux as goaltending coach.

Atlantic Division

-“When the Detroit position became available, I looked at the team, I looked at the staff. This is the organization that I want to be a part of. The way Mike has been able to get the most out of his players is something that I’ve admired." - Former Penguins assistant coach Tony Granato on joining the Red Wings in the the same capacity.

-Former Penguins defenseman Gord Dineen (right) was named head coach of the Toronto Marlies, the Maple Leaf's AHL affiliate.

-The Bruins signed forward David Pastrnak, a first-round pick in this year's draft, to a three-year entry-level contract.

-The Panthers re-signed restricted free agent defenseman Dylan Olsen to a two-year contract. Financial terms were not reported. Olsen, 23, appeared in 44 games last season and scored 12 points (three goals, nine assists).

-The Panthers re-signed restricted free agent forward Garrett Wilson to a one-year two-way contract.

Central Division

-The Predators signed former Coyotes forward Mike Ribeiro ($1.05 million) and former Blues forward Derek Roy ($1 million) to one-year contracts. Coming off a contract with a salary cap hit of $5.5, Ribeiro (right), 34, appeared in 80 games last season and scored 47 points (16 goals, 31 assists). Coming off a contract with a salary cap hit of $4 million, Roy, 31, appeared in 75 games last season and scored 37 points (nine assists, 28 assists).

-EN Says: This seems like a situation of desperate players hooking up with a desperate team. The Predators needed centers while Ribeiro and Roy each needed work. With Ribeiro, there is an element of risk even if he's just signed to a small deal. He was bought out by the Coyotes on his previous contract due to behavioral problems and was labeled a "mistake" by Arizona general manager Don Maloney. If he can straighten up, Ribeiro is still an extremely talented playmaker. It should be noted, while he did play with James Neal in Dallas, they were rarely linemates in five-on-five situations. Regarding Roy, he was at one time a regular 20-goal threat but those days are long gone. He still is a fairly reliable playmaker when healthy. Injuries have been his biggest issues in recent seasons. With the addition of Olli Jokinen as a free agent, the Predators have boosted their depth at center with some cheap signings

-"I had a chance to really focus on myself and really learn about myself. That's why I'm comfortable. What Mr. Maloney said – it shocked some people, my wife wasn't happy about it. I sat down, thought about it. I'm comfortable with myself now. I'm open with what happened or didn't happen with our marriage issues, and really I think I'm comfortable with it and not trying to hide it." - Ribeiro.

-"What you have to look at with him is three years of declining performance, and a whole bunch that goes into it. He's embarrassed by his performance and motivated by the opportunity. In these situations you have to weigh the risk and reward." - Predators general manager David Poile on signing Roy (right).

-The Predators signed forward Kevin Fiala, a first-round pick in this year's draft, to a three-year entry-level contract.

-The Predators signed forward Viktor Arvidsson, a fourth-round pick in this year's draft, to a three-year entry-level contract.

-Avalanche goaltender Semyon Varlamov (right) suffered a minor ankle injury while working out in Switzerland.

-The Wild re-signed restricted free agent forward Jason Zucker to a two-year contract. Financial terms were not reported. Zucker, 22, appeared in 21 games last season and scored five points (four goals, one assist).

-Why do the Blackhawks stress drafting college players?

Pacific Division

-The Coyotes re-signed restricted free agent forward Brandon McMillan to a one-year two-way contract and restricted free agent forward Jordan Szwarz to a two-year contract. Financial terms of Szwarz's deal were not reported.

-The Oilers re-signed restricted free agent forward Tyler Pitlick to a one-year contract. Financial terms were not reported.

Smythe Division

-Former Red Wings/Sabres/Thrashers forward Vyacheslav Kozlov has joined Atlant Mytishchi of Russia's KHL.

-Russian president Vladimir Putin awarded Mercedes Benz vehicles to each member of Russia's gold medal-winning team from this year's IIHF World Championship.

(Photos: Bruce Bennett/Getty Images, Jeff Gross/Getty Images, Leon Halip/Getty Images and Penguins Hockey Cards)

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Uher: 'You have to have something behind those chirps'- 07-15-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

 
 

Chances are there aren't many people within the Penguins organization who are more familiar with new head coach Mike Johnston than forward prospect Dominik Uher. And for all the wrong reasons.

During Uher's junior career with the Spokane Chiefs of the Western Hockey League, his season came to an end twice due to Johnston's Portland Winterhawks. In 2009-10, Uher's first season in Spokane, the Chiefs lost to the Winterhawks, 4-3, in the first round of the postseason. The Chiefs made it to the Western Conference final in 2010-11 but once again lost to the Winterhawks, 4-2.

History aside, Uher, a native of the Czech Republic, is eager to prove himself to Johnston in order to earn a job at the NHL level. A fifth-round pick in 2011, Uher (6-foot-1, 199 pounds) completed his second professional season with the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins in a 2013-14 campaign which saw him set career bests with 68 games and 23 points.

Earlier today, Uher, an attendee in the Penguins' prospect development camp this week, talked about his second professional season, playing on the penalty kill and his impressions of Johnston.

How do you evaluate your second professional season?

"I think the season was pretty good. I learned a lot again. I developed [being used] in certain situations like the penalty kill. I was really happy with the season I had. It can always be better but it can always be worse so I look at it as a good season. I look at it as a step forward."

You played in in 68 games last season. That was up from 53 in 2012-13.

"Yeah. I think I was more consistent so the coach relied on my a little more. I played more games and had better ice time [per game] so I was really happy with how last season went for me."

How important is the penalty kill to your game?

"It’s a big part of my game. It’s probably the biggest I have to focus on the most. I worked a lot with [Wilkes-Barre/Scranton assistant coach Alain Nasreddine] and [head coach John Hynes] on those special situations. You have to have a good stick and good body positioning. I think I developed a lot in penalty killing. There’s still a lot to learn."

You led the team with three short-handed goals last season. How much of a weapon is it for you to be a short-handed scoring threat?

"When you’re on the penalty kill, you usually have five skilled [opponents], they usually want to score goals. Not pay attention to the defensive side. If I get a puck and I see a chance to go, I’m going. That’s good that I scored some goals last year. I hope it keeps going."

Is agitation part of your game?

"A little bit. I want to try to get a little bit bigger over the summer so I can have more muscle for those situations."

How much of it is being physical with an opponent versus chirping or talking to him on the ice?

"There’s always the talk and there’s always some chirps but you have to have something behind those chirps. If it gets to dropping gloves, you’ve got to be ready."

You're only 21. Are you still growing physically?

"Yes. I feel like I’m getting stronger each year. Like you mentioned, I’m 21 so I have a few more years to develop my size, my skills and my strength."

In the playoffs, you primarily played on a line with Bobby Farnham and Adam Payerl. That sounds like a cantankerous, angry, mean line.

"It was our job. We were supposed to be scared to play against. We were put on against [the opponents’] top lines. I think we did a pretty decent job, especially in the first two rounds. We played pretty well I think. Those players helped me a lot throughout the series and throughout the game."

There was a lot of turnover at the NHL level for the Penguins. There appears to be some open spots among the bottom six forwards. Do you identify that as an opening for you?

"Yes, yes. Of course. It’s a new coach and new staff here so you want to impress. It starts today. You want to have a good summer. You want to impress them at the rink. You never know what’s going to happen, right? The coach might give you a chance. Sometimes that’s all you need."

You played for the Spokane and against Johnston quite a bit. What do you recall from those games?

"I played against him for three years. It was always great games. Unfortunately, they always got the better of us in the playoffs. Portland was always good. He’s a great coach. He knows how to coach. I’m really excited to have him on this team."

How would you describe Portland's style of play under Johnston?

"When we played Portland, they’re always deadly offensively. I figure he’s going to fit in great with the offensive power [the Penguins] have. If you see Portland in past years, they’re always successful. They reach the conference finals almost every year and finals too. It’s a successful organization that had a great coach and now he’s here."

What's next for you in becoming an NHL player?

"Like I mentioned before, I really want to become a great penalty killer. If someone gets hurt here [at the NHL level] or if there’s a spot for penalty killing, I want to be out there. I going to do my best to have great details on the penalty kill and of course be stronger and be a physical guy that can bring some energy shift in and shift out."

(Photo: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins)

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Empty Netter Assists - 07-15-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

Penguins

-Former Penguins assistant coach Tony Granato (right) was hired as an assistant coach by the Red Wings.

-Before hiring Granato, Red Wings coach Mike Babcock did his homework by talking to Sidney Crosby, Chris Kunitz and former Penguins general manager Ray Shero.

-Former Penguins forward Luca Caputi has joined Oskarshamn of Sweden's Allsvenskan league.

-Former Penguins forward Toby Petersen was named assistant coach of the AHL's Springfield Falcons, the Blue Jackets' AHL affiliate.

-Pennsylvania taxpayers are picking up more of the tab on the debt still owed on Consol Energy Center.

-Happy 61st birthday to former Penguins forward John Flesch. A free agent signing midway through the 1977-78 season, Flesch's Penguins career amounted to 29 games and 12 points that campaign. He was released in the 1978 offseason.

-Happy 63rd birthday to former Penguins all-star forward, coach and scout Rick Kehoe (right). Acquired prior to 1974-75 season in a deal which sent Blaine Stoughton and a draft pick to the Maple Leafs, Kehoe spent 11 seasons with the Penguins as a player. He immediately showed what he could do with the Penguins in 1974-75 by playing in 76 games and netting 32 goal and 63 points. He appeared in nine postseason games that spring and recorded two assists. His numbers improved in 1975-76 as he recorded 76 points in 71 games. He failed to record a point in three playoff games that season. The 1976-77 season saw him appear in all 80 of the team's games and recorded his second 30-goal season with the Penguins while netting 57 points. He appeared in three postseason games that spring and recorded two assists. Kehoe's production took a slide over the next two seasons as he had 50 points in 70 games during 1977-78 and 45 points in 57 games during 1978-79. During the 1979 playoffs, he contributed two assists. He rebounded in 1979-80 with a team-leading 30 goals and 60 points in 79 games and netted seven points in five playoff games. Kehoe's finest season was in 1980-81 when he appeared in 80 games while scoring a career-best 55 goals and 88 points and recorded three assists in five games. His 55 goals were a franchise record at the time. He followed that up in 1981-82 by recording 85 points in 71 games. That spring, he scored five points in a near-upset of the defending Stanley Cup champion Islanders in a five-game preliminary round series. Kehoe scored both of the Penguins' game-winning goals that series. The decline for Kehoe and the Penguins began in 1982-83 as he was limited to 65 points in 75 games. Injuries began to take their toll in 1983-84 as he could only appear in 57 games and score 45 points. Finally, in 1984-85, Kehoe could only squeeze six games and two assists out of his battered body before retiring at the age of 33. At the time of his retirement, Kehoe was the team's all-time leading scorer with 636 points. The team brought Kehoe back as an assistant coach in 1987-88 and he held that position on and off until early in 2001-02. During that time, Kehoe was a member of the team's first two Stanley Cup championships in 1991 and 1992. Early in 2001-02, Kehoe took over as head coach for Ivan Hlinka. Under Kehoe, the team went 28-37-8-5 and missed the playoffs. Kehoe returned in 2002-03 but once again failed to reach the postseason with a 27-44-6-5 record. He was replaced in the 2003 offseason by Eddie Olczyk. One of the team's most accomplished players, Kehoe was inducted into the franchise's hall of fame in 1992. He is the franchise's fourth all-time leading scorer with 636 points trailing only Mario Lemieux (1,723), Jaromir Jagr (1,079) and Sidney Crosby (769). Appearing in two all-star games (1981 and 1983) and winning Lady Byng Award in 1981, Kehoe is fourth all-time with the franchise in games played (722), fourth in goals (312), eighth in assists (324) and fourth in power-play goals (95). In 37 postseason games he scored 21 points. He currently works as a professional scout with the Rangers.

-Happy 63rd birthday to former Penguins forward Chuck Arnason. Acquired midway through the 1973-74 season along with Bob Paradise in a deal which sent Al McDonough to the Atlanta Flames, "The Rifleman" spent parts of three seasons with the Penguins. Following the trade, Arnason appeared in 41 games and scored 18 points for the Penguins in 1973-74. His only full season in Pittsburgh was 1974-75. Primarily playing on a line Pierre Larouche and Bob "Battleship" Kelly, Arnason played in 78 games and recorded 58 points. He also contributed six points in nine playoff games that spring. In 1975-76, after 30 games and 10 points, Arnason was traded to the Kansas City Scouts along with Steve Durbano and a draft pick in exchange for Simon Nolet, Ed Gilbert and a draft pick. In 169 games with the Penguins, Arnason scored 86 points, 98th-most in franchise history.

-Happy 28th birthday to former Penguins forward Tyler Kennedy (right). A fourth-round pick in 2004, Kennedy spent parts of fives seasons with the Penguins. As a rookie in 2007-08, "TK" was called up from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton of the AHL and appeared in 55 games while recording 19 points. He also appeared in all 20 of the team's playoff games that spring and contributed four assists. In 2008-09, Kennedy played in 67 games and netted 35 points. In the playoffs, he once again played in all 24 of the club's playoff games while recording a team-leading three game-winning goals and nine points and helped the franchise win its third Stanley Cup title. Kennedy's numbers took a tumble in 2009-10 as he only appeared in 64 games and scored 25 points. In 10 postseason games that season, he failed to score a point. He rebounded in 2010-11 by reaching career highs in games (80), goals (21), assists (24) and points (45). That spring, he appeared in seven postseason games and contributed three points. In 2011-12, injuries limited Kennedy to 60 games and 33 points. During the 2012 postseason, he saw action in six games and recorded six points. The 2012-13 season saw Kennedy play in 46 games and score 11 points. Kennedy appeared in nine postseason games and scored five points. Last offseason, Kennedy was traded to the Sharks in exchange for a draft pick. In 372 games with the Penguins, Kennedy scored 168 points, 50th-most in franchise history. In 76 postseason games, he had 27 points.

Neapolitan Ice Cream Metropolitan Division

-All three of former Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur's sons are attending the team's prospect development camp.

-The Flyers signed defenseman Jesper Pettersson, a seventh-round pick in this year's draft, to a three-year entry-level contract.

-The Hurricanes signed forward Justin Shugg to a one-year two-way contract.

Atlantic Division

-The Bruins re-signed restricted free agent defenseman Matt Bartkowski to a one-year deal worth a total of $1.25 million. Coming off a contract with a salary cap hit of $650,000, Bartkowski, a native of Mt. Lebanon, appeared in 64 games last season and recorded 18 assists.

-EN Says: Bartkowski is a depth defenseman who had to fill in quite a bit last season as injuries ravaged the Bruins' defense. This is a fair contract.

-Entering the final year of his contract, Babcock wants to work out an extension by the fall.

Central Division

-The Blackhawks hired former Panthers coach Kevin Dineen as an assistant coach.

-With the Blackhawks facing a salary cap crunch, they may turn to prospect Stephen Johns, a native of Ellwood City, to fill out their blue line.

Pacific Division

-The Canucks signed restricted free agent forward Linden Vey (right) to a one-year two-way contract. Vey's signing rights were acquired from the Kings earlier this offseason.

-The Coyotes signed associate coach Jim Playfair to a multi-year contract extension.

Norris Division

-Former Canucks/Rangers/Oilers head coach Tom Renney will be hired as president and CEO of Hockey Canada.

-Former Blue Jackets/Rangers/Flyers forward Nikolay Zherdev has joined Dynamo Moskva of Russia's KHL.

-Former Avalanche/Capitals forward Ryan Stoa has joined Metallurg Novokuznetsk of Russia's KHL.

-Former Predators forward Andreas Thuresson has joined Sibir Novosibirsk of Russia's KHL.

(Photos: Bruce Bennett/Getty Images, Jim McIsaac/Getty Images, Jamie Sabau/Getty Images and Penguins Hockey Cards)

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