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'Ride Along' still in driver's seat of box office, No. 1 again

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

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Kevin Hart and Ice Cube are riding high again, with “Ride Along” the No. 1 movie for the second week in a row. “Lone Survivor” continues to attract patrons with its real-life story of an ill-fated Navy SEAL mission while “I, Frankenstein” could use a jolt of the paddles to bring it to box office life. 
 
Not registering in the top 10 is “Gimme Shelter,” playing only at AMC-Loews at the Waterfront and Cinemark Tarentum in the Pittsburgh area. It’s on just 385 screens (compared with the 3,472 of “The Nut Job” and 3,387 of the new Jack Ryan movie) and brought in $720,950 in its first weekend. 
 
Here are the early estimates courtesy of Rentrak: 
 
1. “Ride Along” — $21,161,530, bringing its North American gross so far to $75,406,840
2. “Lone Survivor” — $12,600,570, for $93,614,531 since release. 
3. “The Nut Job” — $12,316,000, or $40,271,245 in two weeks. 
4. “Frozen” — $9,035,000, for $347,816,000 and that’s before this weekend’s sing-along hits theaters. 
5. “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit” — $8,800,000, or $30,168,133 so far. 
6. “I, Frankenstein” — $8,275,000. 
7. “American Hustle” — $7,100,000, nudging its running gross to $127,038,753.
8. “August: Osage County” — $5,041,000, for $26,526,501 to date. 
9. “The Wolf of Wall Street” — $5,000,000, edging toward the $100 million mark with $98,030,454.
10. “Devil’s Due” — $2,750,000, or $12,885,963 since last week’s release. 

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Alfonso Cuaron seems Oscar bound with DGA win for "Gravity"

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

 

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A report from the Associated Press about the DGA Awards which likely will signal an Oscar win for the director of “Gravity.” 
 
By Jessica Herndon 
AP Film Writer
 
bullockLOS ANGELES (AP) — Alfonso Cuaron was awarded the top film honor from the Directors Guild of America for “Gravity” on Saturday night. 
 
In the recent bustle of Hollywood shows, “Gravity,” David O. Russell’s con caper “American Hustle,” and Steve McQueen’s historical epic “12 Years a Slave” were competing in the tightest three-way Oscar race in years. But the win gives Cuaron’s lost-space-saga an edge on the journey to the Academy Awards. 
 
With 10 Oscar nominations, Cuaron’s film is likely to gain the most Academy Awards this year. “American Hustle” also has 10 nominations, while “12 Years a Slave” has nine. The early momentum of “12 Years a Slave” has begun to deflate following this evening’s upset and the results of the Golden Globes. McQueen’s film was nominated for seven Globes, but only took home one — best motion picture, drama.
 
However, it is unlikely “12 Years a Slave” will go home empty-handed on Oscar night, as actress Lupita Nyong’o, who is nominated for the best supporting Oscar, is the likely favorite. 
 
Earning the DGA award makes Cuaron a near shoo-in to win the best director Oscar on March 2. The Directors Guild recipient nearly always goes on to claim the same prize on Hollywood’s biggest night. 
 
In the 65-year history of the DGA awards, the winner has failed to also take home the best director Oscar just seven times. Ben Affleck, who presented Cuaron with his guild award, won the same accolade last year for “Argo” but was denied a best director nomination at the Oscars. However, like many DGA winners, “Argo” went on to win the best-picture prize at the Oscars. 
 
While accepting his trophy, Cuaron recalled looking at satellite images of Earth from space. 
 
“What you cannot see from up there is this bizarre experiment of nature that is the human experience,” said Cuaron, a first-time DGA winner. “That experiment is what directors try to sort out with our films. Thankfully, that experience is as diverse as the films as these filmmakers make.” 
 
Cuaron also thanked his son and “Gravity” co-writer Jonas Cuaron. 
 
Sandra Bullock, the star of “Gravity,” was on hand to applaud Cuaron for his honor. While introducing the director for his nomination speech, Bullock joked that she could barely understand her director while shooting “Gravity.” 
 
“I had no idea whether ice meant ice or ice,” she said, pointing to her eye. Later, Cuaron shot back at the actress, saying that actors feel that the universe revolves around them. When he looked over at Bullock, she pointed to her ear and mouthed, “I can’t understand you.”
 
Jehane Noujaim won the documentary prize for “The Square,” which was acquired by subscription service Netflix last year and depicts the tumult of the Egyptian Revolution beginning in 2011. 
 
“I’m very humbled and very grateful,” said Noujaim, whose previous documentaries include “Startup.com” and “Control Room.” “This film is the most deeply personal film I’ve made, watching my country change before me when I never thought change was possible. It redefined my understanding of what was possible.” 
 
Receiving the loudest applause of the evening were diversity award recipients Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers. 
 
 
“We are being given an award for something all of us should be doing anyway,” said Rhimes. “There is such a lack of lack of people hiring women and minorities that when someone does so on a regular basis they are given an award. There shouldn’t need to be an award. The lack of diversity in Hollywood is not because of the lack of talent. It’s because of the lack of access. People hire their friends. If it’s been a white boy’s club for 70 years, that’s a lot of white boys hiring one another. Rock some boats. Something original is what the public is starving for.”
 
Steven Soderbergh, the “sex, lies, and videotape” and “Ocean’s Twelve” filmmaker, won the TV movie and miniseries prize for HBO’s “Behind the Candelabra,” which recounted the relationship of Liberace and his lover Scott Thorson. 
 
Soderbergh, who once served as a DGA first vice president, was also honored with the Robert B. Aldrich Award for his service to the guild. 
 
“Sometimes you feel empty, and you’re just overwhelmed and you look and see how willing your team is to carry you forward, and you get an extra burst of energy, and you keep going,” said Soderbergh while accepting his first-ever DGA award. 
 
“Breaking Bad” mastermind Vince Gilligan was also honored with his first DGA award for directing the series finale of the AMC drama. 
 
Other winners included: 
 
— Comedy series: Beth McCarthy-Miller, “30 Rock.” 
 
— Reality: Neil P. DeGroot, “72 Hours.” 
 
— Variety special: Glenn Weiss, 67th annual Tony Awards. 
 
— Children’s program: Amy Schatz, “An Apology to Elephants.” 
 
— Variety series: Don Roy King, “Saturday Night Live.” 
 
— Commercial: Martin de Thurah, Hennessy VS and Acura MDX 2014. 
 
Other than the Writer’s Guild Awards on Feb. 1, there are no major awards before the Oscars. Hollywood’s high season goes quiet for a few weeks as several thousand members of the motion picture academy have the last word with their balloting. 
 
Jane Lynch hosted Saturday night’s untelevised DGA awards with presenters including Bullock, Tom Hanks, Ben Affleck, Don Cheadle, Kerry Washington and Steve Coogan.
——
AP Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang contributed to this report.
 
Photos: Sandra Bullock arrives at the DGA Awards dinner at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel on Saturday, and “Gravity” director and winner Alfonso Cuaron poses with last year’s winner, Ben Affleck, in the press room. Photos by Richard Shotwell Invision/AP.

 

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Leo and Jonah do Jack and Rose "Titanic" move on "SNL"

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

snl top jonah-leo 01 

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Who says Leonardo DiCaprio hates anything related to “Titanic”?

He just reenacted the scene where Jack holds Rose and she throws her arms out and feels like she’s flying – but with Jonah Hill during the comedian’s monologue on “Saturday Night Live.”

Host Jonah confessed he was “acting like a big shot,” after DiCaprio stepped out and said, “I knew this was going to happen if you got nominated. You don’t have to pretend anymore, you’re a real actor now. You should be humble now, you should be gracious. Get it?”

And then Hill asked his “Wolf of Wall Street” co-star if they could repeat their on-set maneuver that calmed him down. That's when they did the signature "Titanic" move. Great way to start the show, immediately followed by a commercial for "Wolf."  

Both men are nominated for Oscars for Martin Scorsese's "Wolf of Wall Street."  Below, an NBC promotional photo for Hill's "SNL" hosting stint. snl top hill 01

 

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Global Chill

Written by Rob Rogers on .

John Kerry is doing his best to build a fire for peace in Syria ... but the rest of the players at the table seem pretty cold to the idea. 

012614 Global Chill

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Whiplash big winner at Sundance; Pittsburgh shows Terrible Towel and talent

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

 

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dockellisThe Sundance Film Festival handed out its awards Saturday night and there were no shout-outs for the Dock Ellis documentary or "Immaculate Reception" short. A year ago, "Blood Brother" was a big winner.

However, Pittsburgh was represented in any number of ways — including with the Terrible Towel along with Carl Kurlander of Steeltown Entertainment Project; Charlotte Glynn with her short film, “Immaculate Reception”; John Paul Hortsmann, an editor on “Cold in July” starring Michael C. Hall, Sam Shepard and Don Johnson; and Dan Green, director of CMU’s Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program. 

 
Winners: 

 

 

U. S. Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic

 

Whiplash

U. S. Grand Jury Prize: Documentary

 

Rich Hill

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic

 

To Kill a Man

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Documentary

 

Return to Homs

     

Audience Award: U. S. Dramatic presented by Acura

 

Whiplash

Audience Award: U.S. Documentary presented by Acura

 

Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory

Audience Award: World Cinema Dramatic

 

Difret

Audience Award: World Cinema: Documentary

 

The Green Prince

Audience Award: Best of NEXT

 

Imperial Dreams

     

Directing Award: U. S. Dramatic

 

Fishing Without Nets/ Cutter Hodierne

Directing Award: U. S. Documentary

 

The Case Against 8/ Ben Cotner & Ryan White

Directing Award: World Cinema Dramatic

 

52 Tuesdays/ Sophie Hyde

Directing Award: World Cinema Documentary

 

20,000 Days on Earth/ Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard

     

Cinematography Award: U. S. Dramatic

 

Low Down/ Christopher Blauvelt

Cinematography Award: U. S. Documentary

 

E-TEAM/ Ross Kauffman & Rachel Beth Anderson

Cinematography Award: World Cinema Dramatic

 

Lilting/ Ula Pontikos

Cinematography Award: World Cinema Documentary

 

Happiness/ Thomas Balmès & Nina Bernfeld

     

U. S. Dramatic Special Jury Award for Breakthrough Talent

 

Dear White People/ Justin Simien

U. S. Dramatic Special Jury Award for Musical Score

 

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter/ The Octopus Project

U. S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Intuitive Filmmaking

 

The Overnighters

U. S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Use of Animation

 

Watchers of the Sky

World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award for Ensemble Performance

 

God Help the Girl

World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for Cinematic Bravery

 

We Come as Friends

     

Editing Award: U. S. Documentary

 

Watchers of the Sky

Editing Award: World Cinema Documentary

 

20,000 Days on Earth

     

Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award: U.S. Dramatic

 

The Skeleton Twins/ Craig Johnson & Mark Heyman

Screenwriting Award: World Cinema Dramatic

 

Blind/ Eskil Vogt

Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize

 

I Origins

     

Short Film Grand Jury Prize

 

Of God and Dogs

Short Film Jury Award: US Fiction

 

Gregory Go Boom

Short Film Jury Award: International Fiction

 

The Cut

Short Film Jury Award: Non-fiction

 

I Think This is the Closest to How the Footage Looked

Short Film Jury Award: Animation

 

Yearbook

Short Film Special Jury Award for Unique Vision

 

Rat Pack Rat

Short Film Special Jury Award for Non-Fiction

 

Love. Love. Love.

Short Film Special Jury Award for Direction and Ensemble Acting

 

Burger

Short Film Audience Award, Presented by YouTube

 

Chapel Perilous

 

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