Print

PSO album gets nod from Gramophone

Written by Elizabeth Bloom on .

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's recently released Strauss tone poems album has received plenty of praise, most recently as an editor's pick for Gramophone Magazine. The CD is available at www.pittsburghsymphony.org. More from the PSO:

Gramophone magazine picked "Strauss," the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's recent recording of Strauss tone poems on Reference Recordings Fresh! label, as one of its "Editor's Choice" recordings for March 2014.

Reviewer Ivan March said of the recording, "This is one of the outstanding Strauss CDs of the year; the quality of playing and recording makes it very recommendable indeed." He also credited Music Director Manfred Honeck for his interpretations, "which vividly bring out the music's emotional and pictorial detail."

The CD was released in November 2013 and has received numerous positive reviews. A second release in the collaboration with Reference Recordings will be released in July and features work by Dvořák and Janáček.

"Strauss" was recorded and mastered by the team at Soundmirror, whose outstanding orchestral, solo, opera and chamber recordings have received more than 70 Grammy nominations and awards. FRESH! is part of Reference Recordings' mission to encourage artists and give them a strong platform for promotion and sales nationally and internationally.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra recordings are made possible by a generous grant from BNY Mellon.

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Penguins acquire Goc from Panthers - 03-05-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

 

The Penguins addressed their bottom six forwards this afternoon by acquiring forward Marcel Goc from the Panthers in exchange a fifth-round pick in 2014 and a third-round pick in 2015.

Goc, 31, is in the final year of a three-year contract with a salary cap hit of $1.7 million. He is scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent after this season. In 62 games this season, he has 23 points (11 goals, 12 assists).

Goc (6-foot-1, 197 pounds), averages 16:59 of ice time a game, including 2:17 on the penalty kill and 0:53 on the power play. He has taken 1,090 faceoffs this season, 16th-most in the NHL, and has won 52.8 percent of them.

While he has yet to miss a game this season, Goc, a native of Germany, has a history of injuries, including with a concussion which caused him to miss 22 games in 2011-12. He has not played an entire slate of games in either of the last two complete NHL seasons.

Goc has also spent time in the NHL with the Sharks and Predators during his NHL career. He is the second

A few highlights:

EN Says: This certainly improves the bottom six forwards but Goc is primarily a center. This team needs wings on the bottom two lines. Goc doesn't have an extensive history of playing wing. That said, this team is much better with Marcel Goc as a fourth line center - if that is the plan - than Craig Adams or Joe Vitale.

Giving up a third rounder and a fifth rounder seems a tad high but it won't wreck the organization.

(Photo: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Trade deadline chat - 03-05-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

We will be chatting the final two hours of the trade deadline (3 p.m.)

Click here to join the fun or participate in the box below:

 

(Photo: Jen Fuller/Getty Images)

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Mapping Pittsburgh's history through "The Digs"

Written by Ethan Magoc on .

Almost 18 months ago, the Post-Gazette launched its photo archive project, “The Digs."

In that time, on “The Digs” we have told and re-told stories about landmarks across Western Pennsylvania, about local personalities such as Porky Chedwick and Mean Joe Greene and covered topics as far ranging as Pittsburgh parking headaches and the North Side’s 1927 gas tank explosion. We hope you have been digging the journey through our region’s history as much as we are.

Still, we’ve been missing a way to help you better explore that history. Since August 2012, we’ve uploaded close to 300 posts on "The Digs." That’s a lot. And without any geographic bearings, it’s easy to get lost.

And so we recently plotted “The Digs.” You can now explore all of our location-based posts in an easy-to-use Google Fusion Tables map. Click here to try it.

Around 40 entries couldn’t be plotted precisely and were left out. We did our best to make the locations as accurate as possible, but if you think something is in the wrong spot, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and I will look into it.

We’ll also be using the map to explore undercovered neighborhoods that we haven’t yet written about. You're welcome to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for future posts to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Putting guilt to work for the neighborhood

Written by Diana Nelson Jones on .

 

 federalst
In an article in Strong Towns today, “Guilt and the Sport of Buying Local” writer Gracen Johnson explores the concept of taking personal responsibility for the economic well-being of your town, city or neighborhood.
 
You may pay a little more at the corner storefront than on Amazon or at a national chain but the real cost would be not having the corner storefront around. The little more you pay is exponentially more to the merchant whose livelihood depends on the neighborhood as much as the neighborhood depends on his livelihood. Sometimes, that merchant is your neighbor.
 
When retail is small, it becomes more integrated into daily patterns, and the more small retail there is, the less trouble you have integrating it. It’s easier to walk three blocks for milk and eggs than to drive to a big parking lot to get them.
 
But the point of buying local is so purposeful that it can sometimes be inconvenient. I make a side trip every two weeks to buy pet food at the only indy pet store I know of in the city, Smiley’s Pet Pad in Shadyside. It's not out of the way because I am already in the East End doing other errands. I may pay a little more; it’s negligible in the scheme of things. I believe my business means something to Smiley’s business. It would mean nothing to Petco.
 
But it’s more than “us” people vs. "them” corporations. Corporations hire our neighbors and some small businesses are legally corporations. It’s more about supporting people whose stores are size equivalent to neighborhood places, a scale that lets you get to know each other and engage in interpersonal uplift. 
 
That matters.
 
Johnson’s article is eloquent. Here’s a portion: 
 
“If you’re a small business owner and take a gamble on this property, you’ve got to be bringing in over $100 per day just to pay rent. Then there’s the cost of your inventory, wages, marketing, administration, etc. When I think of how small the profit margins are on most of what I buy, and how infrequently I purchase items with large margins this all started to make my head spin. The cafés that serve as our offices, meeting rooms, and third places are earning mere cents on a cup of coffee. Our downtown art store is matching Amazon pricing while paying a team of top-notch staff. How do these places survive? Are the owners just in it as a labour of love?
 
“I’ve long been a proponent of the buy local movement for the warm fuzzies. Warm fuzzies are a powerful motivator but now I can bolster them with an even stronger one: guilt. Not a gross guilt that you want to shake off your back but a guilt carved out of admiration.
 
“It was defined a week later for me in [a] beautiful interview on Fresh Air between Terry Gross and author Ann Patchett who opened a bookstore in Nashville.”
 
The interview contained this quote from Ms. Patchett, the author of the brilliant page-turner “Bel Canto” among other novels:
 
“It’s not that I think no one should buy books online. […] But I think that what’s important is if you value a bookstore, if that’s something that you want in your community, if you want to take your children to story hour, if you want to meet the authors who are coming through town, if you want to get together for a book club at a bookstore or come in and talk to the smart booksellers, if you want to have that experience of a bookstore, then it is up to you.
 
“It is your responsibility to buy your book in the bookstore. And that’s what keeps the bookstore there. And that’s true for any little independent business. You can’t go into the little gardening store and talk to them about pesticides and when do you plant and what kind of tools do you need and use their time for an hour and their intelligence and then go to Lowe’s and buy your plants for less. That you cannot do.”
 
Gracen Johnson continues:
 
“The good guilt has turned me pretty price insensitive. That’s not to say I’m flush with cash or that the independent retailer is more expensive. It’s just that once I meet my basic needs, it matters to me less how much I acquire than how I acquire it. To enjoy the place-making benefits of unique local businesses, we need to make sure they can cover their rent too.”
 
Photo of Federal Street businesses, 1930s: Courtesy of the University of Pittsburgh Archives
 

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.