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The F Word romcom with Daniel Radcliffe gets new name, date

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

 

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“The F Word,” starring Daniel Radcliffe and executive produced by Pittsburgh native Jesse Shapira, has a new title and release date.

Variety reports and CBS Films confirms, on its website, the romcom has been renamed “What If” and will open in New York and Los Angeles on Aug. 1 and expand during the next two weeks. That means Pittsburgh likely will get the movie Aug. 15.

Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan play friends who try to resist their obvious attraction. She’s an animator and has a longtime boyfriend, and he is a medical school dropout who hates the idea of infidelity, due to his parents’ divorce and ex-girlfriend’s affair.

I saw it in Toronto, where it had its world premiere and where it was enthusiastically received and deservedly so. It’s warm and funny and allows the “Harry Potter” star to flash a winning, comic, romantic and adult side – thanks to a brief skinny dipping scene in Lake Ontario (the movie mainly is set in Toronto).

The film is from Michael Dowse (“Goon,” “Fubar,” “It’s All Gone Pete Tong,” “Take Me Home Tonight”) and also stars Rafe Spall, Megan Park, Adam Driver and Mackenzie Davis

 

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Goc followed brother's lead to the NHL - 03-14-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

How rare are German-born players in the NHL? Only 27 players from Germany (including West and East Germany) have played in the league throughout its history. That includes players such Dany Heatley and Walt Tkaczuk who were raised and trained in North America. 

To put that in perspective, the state of Pennsylvania has produced 28 NHL players.

The Goc family has accounted for two of those players from Germany with new Penguins center Marcel Goc being the most accomplished of the clan with 554 games of NHL experience. Older brother Sasha, a defenseman, played briefly with the Devils and Lightning in the early 2000s. Younger brother Nikolai is a defenseman with Adler Mannheim of Germany's DEL.

Acquired at the trade deadline last week from the Florida Panthers, Goc, 30, has carved out a nine-year career in the NHL as a dependable bottom-six center adept at killing penalties and winning faceoffs. In addition to the Penguins and Panthers, Goc has also spent time with the Predators and Sharks, the team which selected him in the first round of the 2001 draft.

The third German-born player to play for the Penguins (defenseman Sven Butenschon and center Randy Gilhen preceded him), Goc talked about his journey to the NHL earlier today:

How tough is it for a German to make the NHL?

"I guess it’s as tough for anybody else. Hockey in Germany is not as popular as we would like. Everything there is about soccer. That’s so huge in Germany and all over Europe. There’s some youth teams and youth programs that are getting better. I think we have a few young Germans here in the [North American] junior leagues. It’s not easy to make the NHL. You’ve got to make the transition to come over here and work your way up. I know some that tried it and were here for two, three or four years and they decided to go back to Germany. At one point, you’ve got to make a decision in your life if you want to keep trying or you want to go back."

Did you grow up a fan of any German players like Uwe Krupp?

"Yeah. That might be the biggest name in Germany. Everybody knows he won the Stanley Cup. He scored the [Cup-clinching goal for the Avalanche in the 1996 final]. He was the coach of the national team and right now, he’s coaching in Cologne in Germany and is pretty successful there. That’s one person everybody looked up at. Marco Sturm, Jochen Hecht, they were … I don’t know how many years before me … those are guys I watched coming over here. My older brother, Sasha, he’s four years older than me, he came over, stayed for four years. Was up and down. Played a few games in the NHL with New Jersey than he decided to go with his family to go back home."

At what point did you realize the NHL could be a realistic possibility?

“I kind of followed my older brother at that point. He made the step to the German league and I was like, ‘All right, I want to do that too.’ Then he was drafted and came over here [to the NHL]. I’m like, ‘I want to do that too.’ I guess maybe after I was drafted. I was like, ‘I’m drafted. It’s official. I might get a shot.’”

Are the Goc brothers the Staal brothers of Germany?

"Ha. I don’t know. There are two or three brother [groups in Germany]. There have been a few brothers playing hockey."

As a first-round pick, did you have to adjust your game at all to be more of a bottom-six forward?

"We had a real good team in San Jose just like we do here in Pittsburgh. You knew if you made a couple of mistakes, you would get skipped for a shift. You have to make sure to be certain if you make that play, it’s going to get done. Don’t turn pucks over and stuff. For me as a young guy, I don’t know if I changed my game. I just tried to play the right way."

So your style of play is pretty similar to when you broke in as a rookie?

"I think so."

Germany did not qualify for this year's Olympics. What was it like watching the tournament instead of playing in it?

"That was of course a big disappointment for us. It was the first time in history that we didn’t qualify. We had to go though a qualifying tournament last February when the [NHL] lockout was over. It was in Germany. Austria ended up winning our group by a point. We would have liked to be there but we’ll shoot for it in four years."

(Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press)

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Jewish groups apart on Holocaust education bill

Written by Peter Smith on .

The change in a key word -- from "may" to "shall" -- has led to differences between Pennsylvania's Jewish communities over a Holocaust education bill pending in the state Senate.

The House version, passed last year, would allow school districts to teach on the Holocaust, genocide and human rights violations and require state Department of Education to establish curriculum guidelines within a year and make continuing-education programs available for schoolteachers who would teach the subject.

But an amended version, which passed the Senate Appropriations Committee without opposition in December, would mandate all the state's 500-plus districts to teach the subject. 

The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia is supporting the mandate.

 

 

"Teaching about the Holocaust and other genocides is already 'voluntary' and has landed us in the current sorry state of affairs: one where students are graduating without the faintest understanding of these subjects," Philadelphia federation president-elect Bud Newman told the Jewish Exponent.

But with the House wary of imposing curriculum mandates, particularly unfunded ones, others are calling the original version a worthy compromise.

 "All the Jewish federations we have talked to would love to have the mandate to require all kids to be taught about the Holocaust," said Hank Butler, executive director of the Pennsylvania Jewish Coalition. "However, after five years of negotiations (on such legislation), we need to move the bill forward."

Gregg Roman, community relations director for the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, agreed. "Our solution is fully funded, and the onus is on the state to pay for this training" of teachers who would teach the subject, he said.

 

 

 

 

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Orchid show this weekend at Phipps Garden Center

Written by Doug Oster on .

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If you long for spring, there's no better place to get a flower fix than the annual Orchid Society of Western Pennsylvania's Spring Show. Saturday 3/15 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m and Sunday 3/16 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Phipps Garden Center. The garden center is located at Fifth and Shady, it's not the conservatory.

Being greeted by the fragrance of these beautiful plants when walking in the garden center is wonderful. There will be lots of lectures, plants for sale and amazing exhibits too.

Take a day and visit the orchid show, the members are friendly and willing to share all they know about growing orchids and getting them to re-bloom.

Here are all the details.

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New local eagle nest?

Written by John Hayes on .

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A new bald eagle nest has been seen near Aliquippa, Beaver County, according to Post-Gazette reader Steve Cline. In his cellphone photo above, the nest is at the top left side of an electrical tower near the Ohio River.

Cline said the nest has been observed for months. Today, for the first time, two eagles were seen on the nest.

It would be the fourth active bald eagle nest site known to exist in Southwest Pennsylvania. The others are at Hays (where a live camera covers the birds 24/7), Harmar and Crescent.

The Beaver County site has not been confirmed by the state Game Commission.

 


 

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