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Penguins' tradition: Sidney Crosby hand-delivers tickets to fans since 2007

Written by Mila Sanina on .

Knock-knock... 

You open the door. And there before you is Penguins' Sid Crosby himself. 

Imagine that!

It's one of the Penguins' famous traditions -- to send Pittsburgh hockey stars to hand-deliver ticket packages to the homes of season ticket holders. Today is the day when Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and other Penguins have visited some of the lucky Pittsburgh families. 

We have taken a look back at happy faces of Penguins' fans seeing Sidney Crosby at their front door. You'll notice his hair style may look different but it's the same familiar smile.

And remember Alice Kilgore? The woman Sidney Crosby hand-delivered tickets twice for? She didn't believe in her Penguins in 2007 so Crosby brought along the Stanley Cup in 2009.

"I don't think you'll win the Cup this year. Not yet. Maybe next year," she told Crosby.

"I wasn't happy at all," Crosby said of Kilgore's earlier prediction, which stuck with him. "I wanted to win." And they did.

Maybe it's time to visit Ms. Kilgore again?

So here, REWIND.

2013

Carole Darling and her son-in-law Jimmy Cohen present Sidney Crosby with a piece of roofing from the old Mellon Arena Monday in Squirrel Hill. Sidney Crosby had stopped by their family home in Squirrel Hill to hand-deliver season tickets. Carole and her husband Sandy Darling have been season ticket holders for more than 40 years. 

 

CrosbyTix2013a 2Julia Rendleman/Post-Gazette

2011

Penguins' Sidney Crosby signs memorabilia for Gary Henzler and his family at their Ben Avon home.  Crosby delivered the Gary and Annette Henzler's season tickets and stayed to give autographs.

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2010

Bob and Sherrie Koch with their sons Josh, 12, and twins Matt and Ryan, 13  take a photo with Penguins' star Sidney Crosby after he delivered their season tickets to their Bethel Park home.

CrosbyTix2010a-5 2Robin Rombach/Post-Gazette

2009

Here is a smo-o-o-och! Sidney Crosby receives a kiss from Alice Kilgore after he delivered her season tickets. To Ms. Kilgore's surprise, Crosby also had the Stanley Cup with him. That was the second time Crosby visited her home. This is why.

CrosbyTix2009-4 2Nate Guidry/Post-Gazette

 

2008

In this photo, Sidney Crosby is shown the score sheet from 1967 by lifelong season ticket holder David Disney after Crosby hand delivered Mr. Disney's season tickets this afternoon.  Disney has been a season ticket holder since 1967.

CrosbyTix2008b-3 2

 

2007

Pittsburgh Penguins Sidney Crosby hand delivers a season tickets package to season ticket holder Alice Kilgore.

That was his first ticket delivery as Pittsburgh's team captain, the position Crosby assumed on May 31, 2007. (Photos by Pete Diana/Post-Gazette)

CrosbyTix2007b-1 2

CrosbyTix2007a

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How Pittsburgh's tree canopy affects neighborhood surface temperature

Written by Ethan Magoc on .


Tree coverage is sparse on parts of Pennsylvania Avenue in Central Northside and Manchester, which are among the city's hottest neighborhoods, according to a 2010 land surface thermal image. (Ethan Magoc/Post-Gazette)

Which are Pittsburgh's hottest, least tree-covered neighborhoods?

It's that time of summer in Pittsburgh when the sun and humidity make everything generally unpleasant by noon.

The hotter temperatures can be more pronounced in parts of the city where little shade coverage is available, but exactly how much of a difference does a tree canopy make?

Tree Pittsburgh, an environmental advocacy group, enlisted a University of Vermont researcher in 2010 to try to find the answer. Using a satellite, the researcher created a surface thermal image. The one-day snapshot is not a direct correlation to how many trees each neighborhood does or does not have, but it is illustrative of what Tree Pittsburgh calls "urban heat islands."

"It seems to be more correlated with where there are impervious surfaces," said Jen Kullgren, a community forester with Tree Pittsburgh. "Large scale rooftops, dark rooftops, things like that — things that would retain heat in that area."

Many of the North Side neighborhoods, such as Manchester, are among the city's hottest, as is South Side Flats.


A landsat thermal image from Sept. 2, 2010. Click for a larger version. (Courtesy of Tree Pittsburgh)

There has not been a similar image captured since 2010, but the City of Pittsburgh is updating a tree inventory and will finish by summer's end.

City forester Lisa Ceoffe is creating the inventory with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. It's the city's first effort since 2005 to discern a precise count of how many trees it owns in each neighborhood.

And Ceoffe said it's not just a couple of interns driving around, counting trees.

"You need to have a lot of knowledge," she said. "These are skilled arborists who have to be very familiar with tree species and how to look at a tree."

She said 22,000 city trees have been planted through TreeVitalize since the 2005 count. That 2005 inventory actually indicates Manchester and Central Northside have the one of the highest counts of city-owned trees per neighborhood acre.

(This obviously does not include trees your neighbors own.)

Neighborhood Tree count per acre Acres Tree count
Friendship 3.60 68.297 246
Manchester 3.40 179.566 610
Central Northside 3.36 166.475 559
Shadyside 2.70 592.104 1601
Allegheny West 2.52 90.841 229

More than one Pittsburgh neighborhood name contains a nod to trees or, more generally, green space: Greenfield, Oakland, Oakwood, Homewood and Shadyside (and as Brandon points out below, also Beechview, Bloomfield, Glen Hazel, Hazelwood, Fairywood, etc)Glen Hazel, Hazelwood, Fairywood, Beechview, Bloomfield.

Which neighborhood do you think is the city's warmest or least leafy? Let us know in the comments below.

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Chalking up America, one share at a time

Written by Kim Lyons on .

Grant Gordon and Ezra Gold are traveling the country in a 2001 Toyota Echo that also happens to be a mobile chalkboard.

chalkcar1

The two are working on a documentary about their experiences with the ChalkCar project, documenting the sharing economy, as part of the Lyft Creatives program. In every city they visit, they couch-surf (crash on couches offered by strangers) and they encourage people to express themselves creatively on the car's surface.
They plan to end their journey in next month in Nevada, at the Burning Man festival. "It's a place people go to create experiences with others," Grant said, which is part of the mission behind the chalkboard-coated car: creative expression.

chalkcar2

 

 

Unfortunately, when they stopped in Pittsburgh on Monday, it was an overcast day that turned rainy. But between rain showers, they still managed to make a pretty picture.

chalkcar3

 

Check out the ChalkCar project at their website: ChalkCar.com

 

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SocialMediaDay, Pittsburgh style

Written by Kim Lyons on .

I think I could do this blog post almost entirely with embedded tweets.

Last night at Smith Brothers' Agency in the Strip, Pittsburgh's social media movers and shakers met and moved and shook, drank beer, shared stories, and heard from Twitter bigwig Constantine James to mark Social Media Day.

The tweet above is of me, Bobby Cherry of the Trib, and Scott Harbaugh of WPXI. Despite what people may think, when journalists from competing media get together we don't (usually) engage in hand-to-hand combat. Especially not with witnesses who have smartphone/cameras present.

So, after people settled in, Constantine James gave a presentation, and spoke about, fittingly enough, The State of Twitter (spoiler: It's awesome and people love it).

He highlighted various Twitter uses, some by brands, and some unexpected, like the bromance of Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen.

Then each presenter told a five-minute social media "story."


 Mayor Bill Peduto couldn't be there, but his spokeswoman presented a proclamation making June 30, 2014 Social Media Day in Pittsburgh

It was a nice event, with nice people, many of whom had never met IRL. Social media in Pittsburgh is a special thing, as I wrote about for our In the Lead section earlier this year.

If you were at #SmDayPGH and didn't say hi, please feel free to connect with me on Twitter. Some of the better friendships I have in Pittsburgh came to me via social media.

I would always welcome more.

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#Yinzheaven

Written by Golzar Meamar on .

 

#Yinzheaven. That was the hashtag that was trending on Twitter last Friday morning, after the photo of the sunrise over the Downtown buildings that David DiCello tweeted went viral.

 

David DiCello, a Pittsburgh native born and raised in the South Hills, never had plans to go into photography, but now that he has, his work has been shared far and wide across Pittsburgh, and has even been retweeted by the mayor in the past.

 

“I want people to see these pictures of Pittsburgh and say ‘I love my hometown. I love this city,’” DiCello said. “This picture brings out the best of Pittsburgh. It’s overwhelming that people love that photo that much.”

 

Sun rising over the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh from the South Shore

Sun rising over the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh from South Shore (Credit: Dave DiCello)

 

DiCello, 30, did not enter photography to make money or to show off what he could learn by himself. “I got into photography because I love taking pictures and I love this city.”

 

His father was into photography, his son would often play with toy and film cameras. He was always taking pictures.

The moon on the edge of the clouds over Pittsburgh

Moon on the edge of the clouds over Pittsburgh. (Credit: Dave DiCello)

When he started high school and college, DiCello stopped making so many images.

 

“After I graduated, it was always in the back of my mind. I never spent as much time on it as I wanted to,” says DiCello. The practice has grown for him in the past 8 years as he started taking photos again — of Downtown, family vacations, and weddings.

 

“I started looking at different angles of the city. I wanted to bring my vision of Pittsburgh to everyone else.”

 

Even after graduation, DiCello never took a photography class. Instead, he read about the art. “I’ve probably read more photography books in my life than I have textbooks,” he said.

 

After a while, reading turned into practice and now, he is “taking what I know and putting my own twist to it.”

Sunrise below the Ft. Pitt Bridge in Pittsburgh along the Monongahela River

Sunrise below the Ft. Pitt Bridge in Pittsburgh along the Monongahela. (Credit: Dave DiCello)

 

DiCello notes that not all people have the time to take photos and “to see the appreciation for these pictures makes me thankful that people can enjoy it.”


David DiCello’s work can be seen on his website.

 

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Pittsburghers imagine a new inflatable for the Three Rivers

Written by Golzar Meamar on .

There is a big, rubber ducky-shaped void in Pittsburgh's waters and it has not gone unnoticed. Residents of the city today have been tweeting about an alternative 40-foot inflatable splashing back into the rivers — an idea inspired by Mike Dougherty of 96.1 KISS radio, known on Twitter as @fsmikey.
 
Pittsburgh joined a league of other cities, including Hong Kong and Sydney, Australia, in welcoming the rubber duck on Sept. 27, 2013. As you remember, it was quite a sensation. The city was specially chosen as the duck's home by the Dutch artist himself, Florentijn Hofman. The rubber duck, harbored in Pittsburgh until Oct. 26, 2013, has moved to more cities, including Hong Kong, and is now back in the United States, in Norfolk, Va., at the Chrysler Museum of Art.

So what creature or thing could be a good next inflatable floating at the Point? 

 
 

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Map: Which Pittsburgh roads will be paved in 2014?

Written by Ethan Magoc on .

Are you wondering about Pittsburgh's long-term plan to deal with potholes?

We have good news for you. Pittsburgh's Department of Public Works finished its 2014 paving recommendations list last month.

And in case you missed it, last week we ran a story by reporter Moriah Balingit about the city trying to reach 40 miles of road paved this year. 

We also ran a story by reporter Jon Schmitz about PennDOT's plan to pave 138.6 miles of road this year. The article highlights roads outside of city limits.

Bad news is that the document detailing the paving recommendations is hard to read, especially if you are among those residents of Pittsburgh who wants to see exactly what's being paved.

Here, instead, is an interactive map of the road data. Click a blue line to see how much of which street will be paved, with what and at what cost. Click a grey line to see how much of a street outside of city limits will be paved. PennDOT costs were not provided.

What's missing from this map? The when.

A call to the Department of Public Works (DPW) was not helpful. The department says it does not release to the public a schedule for when certain roads will be paved. Tim McNulty, spokesman for the mayor's office, confirmed the difficulty in DPW generating a paving season schedule.

"...there is no long term calendar for when the streets are paved," McNulty wrote in an email. "The scheduling is impacted by weather patterns, staffing, vacation, etc. They do issue short weekly lists, but even those are pretty tentative."

If you're interested in knowing when a specific street on the map will be paved, you can try to call the department at 412-255-8850.

A cleaned-up version of the paving recommendations — sans a few columns — used to make the above map is available for download here.

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