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Pirates on the cover

Written by Heather Schmelzlen on .

Have you seen the front page of today's Post-Gazette?

pirates pg

 

 

In case you can't make out those statistics at the top of the page, here they are:

81: Number of victories by the Pirates so far this season, guaranteeing they will not have a losing season

20: Prior to this season, the number of consecutive losing seasons, a record for the four major sports

1,374-1,796: The Pirates' aggregate win-loss record in the 20 losing seasons since they lost Game 7 of the 1992 National League Championship Series

7: Number of losing seasons between the Steelers and Penguins during the Pirates' losing streak

 

And we're not the only ones who think the Bucs are cover worthy. Sports Illustrated announced today that the team will also grace the front of its Sept. 9 issue.

pirates SI cover 2

You may remember that closer Jason Grilli was on the cover of the July 22 issue. Two Pirates on the cover in one summer? Here's what Sports Illustrated has to say about that:

For the first time in 21 years, the Pittsburgh Pirates will finish with at least a .500 record and for the second time this season, their magical summer has landed them on the cover of Sports Illustrated. All-Star closer Jason Grilli was featured on the front of the July 22 issue and this time it’s another of Pittsburgh’s five All-Stars, centerfielder and MVP candidate Andrew McCutchen, who gets top billing. That’s appropriate because McCutchen might be the single biggest reason the Pirates enter play on Wednesday with a two-game lead in the National League Central as they chase their first division title and playoff berth since 1992, which is also the last time they finished with a winning record.

 

Oh, and just for kicks, this was the Pirates' presence on the front page of the Post-Gazette on Sept. 4, 2012:

pirates skybox

Just a teeny-tiny mention in the skybox ... of the team's loss to Houston the previous night. What a difference a year makes, huh?

 

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To Little Pirates Fans!

Written by Pittsblogher on .

This blog post is dedicated to them! To the very young and very-very young! To the Pirates' fans that have never known how it feels to have their favorite team have a winning season...

... because they hope, they cheer with pure joy... and they are, well, cute.

Especially this guy, who before Pirates' game against Milwaukee yesterday held a drawing addressed to Marte —"get better Starling," it said, according to Deadspin. Marte noticed the kid in the stands and accepted the drawing. He then taped it up in the Pittsburgh dugout.

And this girl munching on popcorn during Bucs-Cubs game at PNC Park (Photo by Pete Diana/Post-Gazette)

bucs girl

 

And this little, very little guy, rooting for the Bucs with some help (Photo by Matt Freed/Post-Gazette).

 

baby-pirates-fan original

And these guys 

 

And this guy....

CapgObUCS

 

... just kidding! :)

 

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Thanks, Burger King, but we got this

Written by Kim Lyons on .

This week, Burger King announced it was unveiling an exciting new sandwich on Sept. 1: A burger with fries on it.

From the AP:

The burger, which clocks in at 360 calories and 19 grams of fat, is a relatively novel offering, but doesn't require any extra investment from Burger King; it's basically a standard beef patty topped with four of the chain's french fries.

burger

 Image: Associated Press

Pittsburghers, naturally were like

 Image: Reactiongifs.com

Because our signature sandwich, courtesy of Primanti Bros. has had fries on it for years. It's a staple of the menu, and always makes the "Reasons Pittsburgh is awesome" lists.

Dear Burger King: Let us know if you need any pointers

primantis fry burger

Image: Primantibros.com
Love, Pittsburgh

<drops mic>

 

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Unregulated guns: A 100-year-old issue

Written by Mila Sanina on .

This week’s riveting story of Antoinette Tuff, the bookkeeper at Ronald McNair Discovery Learning Center in Decatur, Ga., who talked shooter Michael Brandon Hill into surrendering to police, captivated the social web. People praised her courage and disarming empathy, literally disarming.

With every new shooting, a mass shooting or a homicide, we are and will always be hoping for an Antoinette Tuff to save the day and save lives.

But the story of Ms. Tuff is an exception rather than a predictable happy end. The predictable part here is a scenario: a gun or two that were easy to obtain, mental illness, criminality and lives lost for nothing.

Fifty-eight homicides have been documented in Allegheny County this year.

And after every mass shooting, every gun-related homicide together with tragic desperation and deep sadness there is a ray of hope that the moment has come. That it’s time. That Americans cannot afford witnessing another loss of life to senseless crime. That guns need to be regulated. That Japan with a population a hundred times greater than Allegheny County averages 10 gun-related homicides per year, that it only makes sense to examine what they're doing in terms of gun control

But nothing changes: NRA is as powerful as it has been; gun regulation gets stalled and in spite of the calls for action from the president and vice president, the U.S. is where it was before the Newtown shooting last December.

A while ago one of our readers found this article in the August 5, 1922 issue of "The Index of Pittsburgh Life," which was a weekly publication about the events in Pittsburgh.  This article expresses concern about gun violence at the time, how easy it was for anybody to get his or her hands on a weapon, and how this was leading to turmoil in our city, state, and nation.  It’s amazing that this article was written  almost 100 years ago, and today it seems we have made no progress.  

Here is an excerpt:   "There is one thing about the present acute industrial situation which demands state, if not national consideration.  That is the freedom with which Americans, aliens and any sort of human being, young as well as old, can become possessed of the most modern and dangerous firearms.  It is a plain invitation to violence.  That is what usually happens when ignorant Americans and foreigners become angry at each other.  A strike is launched and every mother’s son of the strikers arms himself for any emergency.  There is Sunday drinking of moonshine and the Monday morning newspaper is a gory recital of crimes and shooting.  Revolvers have become too common.  They can be purchased by any one at almost any hardware store without any questions being asked.  A lad in Sewickley was recently killed accidentally with an automatic pistol borrowed by his chum from another boy.  Police have picked up youngsters of not more than nine years with the most dangerous of weapons in their possession.  Revolvers as common as sticks and then we wonder at crime.  No attention is paid to the law forbidding the carrying of concealed weapons.  Look over the collection in almost every police station or district attorney’s office.  Weapons are too easy to procure.  They fall into the hands of too may persons mentally and morally unfit to use them with discretion.  With so much turmoil going on it is a crime to permit the indiscriminate distribution of firearms.  Every one sold should be registered with the police and every person possessing one should be investigated as to his fitness to retain a weapon.  In Great Britain they have a license fee and strict registration.  If there was a closer observance of methods of distribution there would be less crime.  This is a matter that should be given attention now in view of some of the trouble that has been and is expected."

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BetterBatmanThanBenAffleck

Written by Kim Lyons on .

If you've been living in a cave for the past 24 hours (other than the BatCave), or are not as addicted to Twitter as we are at the Pittsblogh, you might have missed the news that Ben Affleck will star as Batman in the sequel to this summer's "Man of Steel" Superman flick. The news was met with surprise:

...skepticism and humor

...and a fair amount of disdain. Despite winning multiple Oscars for "Argo," Affleck did not fare all that well in his last superhero role; 2003's "Daredevil" was widely panned. But, the hive mind of Twitter was all over the subject of who would make a better Batman than Affleck. The lengthy hashtag #BetterBatmanThanBenAffleck was trending worldwide for a while last night. A few of our favorites:

By this morning, there was even a White House petition seeking to ban Affleck from playing Batman

What do you think: Will Ben Affleck make a good Batman? If not, who would you choose (this is assuming you care as much as the Twitterati did)...

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Pittsburgh's 'corpse flower': A big stinking deal

Written by Heather Schmelzlen on .

Around 5 p.m. Tuesday, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden announced that its "corpse flower" (Amorphophallus titanum, also known as the titan arum) was blooming, but not for long.

 

 

My verdict? As I told a friend, "It's like someone let garbage sit out in 100-degree weather for months." But totally worth the trip.

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Linking teenagers with LinkedIn

Written by Kim Lyons on .

Social networking site LinkedIn today introduced University Pages, a way for students, colleges and alumni to connect. In the company announcement, Christina Allen, Director of Product Management at LinkedIn, describes the struggles of her daughter and her daughters' friends as they tried to decide where to attend college, and what career opportunities might result.

The changes, effective Sept. 12,  will allow students as young as 13 (the minimum age in the U.S. is 14) to belong to LinkedIn, with heightened privacy restrictions.

But with much attention on how younger teenagers are apparently not using Facebook, is a social network like LinkedIn, aimed at a professional audience, likely to attract a strong high school following? Or, as Wall Street Journal contributor Peter Kafka suggested, is the presence of teenagers on LinkedIn more likely to drive away more seasoned users?

 

 

What do you think of this idea? Will it change how you use LinkedIn (if you use it at all)?

If so inclined, you can follow the Post-Gazette on LinkedIn here.

 

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