Print

Phipps' Native Plant and Sustainability Conference 10/26/13

Written by Doug Oster on .

The Annual Native Plant and Sustainability Conference will held at Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park brings together national experts for a one-day forum on plants, landscapes and our roles as environmental stewards.

To register, please call 412/441-4442, ext. 3925. The cost per person for this conference is $90 if you register before Oct. 5; after this date, the fee is $105. Price includes lunch.

Phipps Garden Center is located at 1059 Shady Ave., Pittsburgh, PA.

Questions? Please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

This conference counts as a 3.25 hours elective credit for several Phipps certificate programs: Native Plant Landscapes, Sustainable Horticulture, and Landscape and Garden Design. CEU credits for PCH and ISA are pending; please inquire for more information.
 

Schedule

8:45 – 9:15 a.m.

Registration/Coffee

9:15 – 9:25 a.m.

Welcome

9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Wild Collecting in the 21st Century
with David Brandenburg

North America shares with parts of Europe and eastern Asia the distinction of hosting a remarkable and diverse array of temperate-zone plants. Ironically, only a relative handful of these North American native species are currently found in the average residential landscape. There are several advantages to cultivating native plants, and nurseries are beginning to make more of these species available. Did you ever wonder how these new offerings find their way into the market? Botanist David Brandenburg will give you a behind-the-scenes look at how native species are chosen, propagated and disseminated to passionate gardeners eager to expand their plant palettes.

11 a.m. – Noon

Nativars: Blending the Best of Both Worlds
with Maria Zampini

A nativar is a cultivar and/or hybrid of a native species and, according to Dr. Allan Armitage, “they should rule the garden” as they can provide the best of both worlds: a landscape improved by the ecological impact of natives and a way to address problems that usually plague certain native species. Join Maria as she introduces you to some of best new selected native cultivars.

Noon – 1 p.m.

Lunch, Book and Art Sale

1 – 2 p.m.

Growing Caterpillars:
A Tale of Birds, Plants and Conservation 
with Jim McCormac
There are about 2,500 species of moths in Ohio and roughly 150 butterfly species have been recorded. The conspicuous and often showy winged adults are but the short-lived finale of a four-stage life cycle: egg, pupa, caterpillar and adult. Caterpillars make much of the natural world go around and countless billions become food for other organisms. Without vegetation-eating caterpillars, most songbirds would go extinct, plant diversity would plummet, and our forests would fall silent. Learn more about these garden visitors from Jim as he explores their importance to our ecosystem.

2:10 – 2:40 p.m.

Panel Q & A           

2:40 – 2:45 p.m.

Concluding Remarks
           

Speakers

Dr. David Brandenburg, botanist at The Dawes Arboretum, began his career studying Midwest plant life and working as a field naturalist for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.  His passion for botany ultimately led him on a decades-long flora quest culminating in the publication of the National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Wildflowers of North America, a landmark guide offering an innovative approach to identifying and learning about wildflowers in Canada and the U.S.  

Jim McCormac works for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, specializing in nongame wildlife diversity issues.  He was inaugural president of the Ohio Ornithological Society and served for seven years as secretary of the Ohio Bird Records Committee. Jim was the 2009 recipient of the Ludlow Griscom Award and is the author of Birds of Ohio, The Great Lakes Nature Guide, Wild Ohio: The Best of Our Natural Heritage and a forthcoming book on wood-warblers.

Maria Zampini, a fourth generation nurseryman, was the first female president of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association. In 2009, Maria partnered with her father Jim Zampini to form UpShoot, a boutique horticulture marketing firm. In 2012, she was named director of plant development and ornamental program manager for the HGTV HOME Plant Collection. She writes regular columns in American Nurseryman, Horticulture and Garden Center magazines.  

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Pittsburgh Fashion Week closes with Fashion Hall of Fame inductions

Written by Sara Bauknecht on .

Another Pittsburgh Fashion Week has come and gone, and following in the footsteps of tradition it took its final bow with the inductions of the latest crop of Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Fame honorees at the Omni William Penn Hotel, Downtown.

At a luncheon Sunday, the following professionals with ties to Pittsburgh were recognized for their contributions to the fashion and beauty industries:

Michael Barone, creative director of MODA Men’s Fashions; Jean Bryant, retired Pittsburgh Post-Gazette journalist and founder of the Miss Black Teenage and Mr. African American programs; Tom Julian, style expert and author of “Nordstrom Guide to Men’s Style”; Debbie Norrell, lifestyle editor for the New Pittsburgh Courier; E.B. Pepper, owner of e.b. Pepper in Shadyside; and Marianne Skiba, Emmy Award-winning celebrity makeup artist. Honorees have at least 10 years of experience in the fashion or beauty industry and ties to Pittsburgh. 

For the first time, the hall of fame honored an up-and-coming member of Pittsburgh’s fashion and beauty scene, Jacqueline Capatolla, owner of JACQUELINE’s salon and author of “Shear Dreams.”

The afternoon also featured a performance by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School dancers. See photos from the event by Post-Gazette photographer Julia Rendleman below.

HOF5

Some of the Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Fame inductees from left are Tom Julian, Jacqueline Capatolla (Exceptional Artist Awardee), Jean Bryant and Debbie Norrell.


HOFMiyoshi

Pittsburgh Fashion Week founder Miyoshi Anderson emcees the event.


HOFDance

Beatriz Tosta and Kurtis Sprowls of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School perform.


HOFDance2

Graduate students from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School dance for luncheon guests.

 

 

 

Another Pittsburgh Fashion Week has come and gone, and following in the footsteps of tradition it took its final bow with the inductions of the latest crop of Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Fame honorees at the Omni William Penn Hotel, Downtown.

At a luncheon Sunday, the following professionals with ties to Pittsburgh were recognized for their contributions to the fashion and beauty industries:

Michael Barone, creative director of MODA Men’s Fashions; Jean Bryant, retired Pittsburgh Post-Gazette journalist and founder of the Miss Black Teenage and Mr. African American programs; Tom Julian, style expert and author of “Nordstrom Guide to Men’s Style”; Debbie Norrell, lifestyle editor for the New Pittsburgh Courier; E.B. Pepper, owner of e.b. Pepper in Shadyside; and Marianne Skiba, Emmy Award-winning celebrity makeup artist. Honorees have at least 10 years of experience in the fashion or beauty industry and ties to Pittsburgh. 

For the first time, the hall of fame honored an up-and-coming member of Pittsburgh’s fashion and beauty scene, Jacqueline Capatolla, owner of JACQUELINE’s salon and author of “Shear Dreams.”

The afternoon also featured a performance by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School dancers. See photos from the event by Post-Gazette photographer Julia Rendleman below.

 

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Planting trees the right way and a story of one thought to be extinct

Written by Doug Oster on .

blog planting treesIn the foreground is a dawn redwood seedling. Behind it is a mature specimen which is over 100 feet tall. Dawn redwoods were thought to be extinct. When planting trees, be sure you take into account their full size when mature. Photo by Doug Oster

This is the perfect time of the year to plant trees. I'm often asked, "doesn't it make more sense to plant them in the spring?" No, it doesn't actually. The reason we plant in the fall is to take advantage of fall temperatures and light conditions. Both combine to encourage root growth in the tree as opposed to top growth.

I plant trees in the spring, but would prefer to do the job in the fall. A spring planted tree needs water all season. It's putting on root growth, top growth and maybe even flowering too. That's a lot of energy  to expend after dealing with transplant shock.

Probably the biggest mistake made by gardeners when planting a tree is to ignore the planting tag which lists the height and spread of the plant at maturity.

A tree will always try to achieve its genetic size and should never be topped. Cutting the top of a tree off will change the growth habit forever. Usually, the tree will just send out sprouts around the cut in an attempt to reach it s mature height.

I cringe driving by new developments freshly planted with an instant landscape which will be overgrown and problematic in only a few years.

Choose the tree carefully and think long and hard about where it will be happy for the next 50 years.

When choosing a site for planting also look for decent soil. The conventional wisdom these days is to plant the tree without soil amendments. Theoretically
the roots of the plant will search out nutrients in the original soil. If the planting hole is filled with compost, the roots act like they are in a pot and will circle around, becoming root bound.

If the soil is pure clay, there's no sense in planting there, not many plants can survive in those conditions. When the soil is less than ideal, I'll mix some compost with the back fill from the planting hole and also mulch with compost. Some plant experts disagree with this technique, but sometimes as a gardener, you have to do what makes sense to you.

Dig the hole two or three times as wide as the root ball and never plant a tree deeper than it's original planting depth.

The photo above is of a dawn redwood seedling in front of a mature tree. The full grown specimen is 100 feet tall. I've found the perfect spot in the woods to plant the tree. A large oak fell, leaving space for a new planting to take its place.

Dawn redwoods (metasequoia) are beautiful, fast growing, deciduous trees which were once thought to be extinct.

During WWII a group of dawn redwoods were discovered in China. The valley is still a source for the trees today.

The brownish orange exfoliating bark and wonderful pyramidal shape make it the favorite tree in my garden. In fall the green, needle like foliage turns bronze and falls to the ground.

If you've got the space, try one in your garden, you'll be glad you did.

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Fall fashions on full display at Pittsburgh Fashion Week

Written by Sara Bauknecht on .

Fashion shows sometimes prompt people to ponder: How could I ever wear that?

At Pittsburgh Fashion Week, many of these worries were washed away with clothes that almost any fashionista (or fashionisto) could wear from day to day.

Looks for fall available at Pittsburgh malls and retailers were abundant, as well as tips for how to transition a look from day to night. Below are some photos for style inspiration from the "Classic Fall Fashions for Pittsburgh Professionals" runway show earlier this week at Macy's, Downtown, photographed by the Post-Gazette's Bill Wade.

FallMacys1

FallMacys2

FallMacys3

FallMacys4

FallMacys5

FallMacys6

FallMacys7

FallMacys8

FallMacys9

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

The faces of Pittsburgh Fashion Week: Meet founder Miyoshi Anderson

Written by Sara Bauknecht on .

Pittsburgh Fashion Week comes to a close today with the annual Pittsburgh Fashion Hall of Fame inductions at the Omni William Penn Hotel, Downtown.

In addition to the honorees, another woman of the hour is Miyoshi Anderson, Pittsburgh Fashion Week's founder and director. She is responsible for overseeing the week's festivities and leading the way when looking ahead to next year. A former dancer and model, she created the annual event four years ago to help bring more work and networking opportunities to the area for Pittsburgh-based models, designers and stylists.

MAndersonMy favorite part about Pittsburgh Fashion Week is ... everything. But if I had to pick one, being at the Fashion Hall of Fame reminds me that this is what brought us through the week. The luncheon solidifies it.

My favorite part about Pittsburgh Fashion Week is ... keeping the full week organized. Now that we are four years in, we've got a handle on it. It is like organizing seven weddings in one week.

One of my proudest moments at Pittsburgh Fashion Week has been ... accomplishing the inaugural week and watching the fashion industry wake up from being dormant.

My Fashion Week survival tip is ... praying. It keeps me at peace.

If I could feature any designer from any place at Pittsburgh Fashion Week, it would be ... many designers we would like to highlight. We would bring back Zang Toi. Being a high-profile designer he took a chance on a new company. Most of all, he helped make our first year top notch and almost effortless.

My three wardrobe must-haves are ... my very own creation, a peplum belt. It is an accessory that can be added to just about anything: shorts, a dress, slacks, jeans. [Other must-haves are] my latest lip color, pale pink with a light gloss, and my large crystal stud earrings.

To me, fashion is ... a painter's paint palette. You never know what you can create until you step into your closet.

Anything special planned for the fifth anniversary you can give a hint about now? The creative minds are always firing. Nothing can be revealed at this point. We plan to always bring something we never have before, whether it's a new concept, new partnership or new locations.


 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.