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A hodgepodge of gun laws

Written by Rosa Colucci on .

After reading your March 8 editorial "Firing Line: The High Court Is Set to Expand the 2nd Amendment," I sat at my computer in total and complete amazement. While the PG's anti-gun, liberal leaning is hardly a secret, this time you've gone out of your way to show how much history you are willing to ignore to drive home a false point.

McDonald v. City of Chicago is absolutely not about "expanding" the Second Amendment. As was the case in Heller, it is an effort to restore rights taken away by executive fiat. The Bill of Rights is not a collection of laws. All 10 of the first amendments to our Constitution delineate rights that are so basic and so obvious that the Founders felt it necessary to create a list of human rights that the government may not touch, legislate away or infringe upon.

The Supreme Court can only find that the Second Amendment applies across the board to every citizen who is a "constitutional free man," regardless of what state he lives in. Amazingly, the Second Amendment has not gone through the process of incorporation. Detractors to McDonald v. City of Chicago have predictably renewed the outcry of blood in the streets, Dodge City and the Wild West. In every jurisdiction that has restored the right of the individual to keep and to bear arms, crime has dropped. Our national social conscience has insisted that the awesome responsibility that is commensurate with the right to keep and bear arms be held in high regard, and accidental deaths are down as well.

Let's hope the Supreme Court will begin the process of eliminating the hodgepodge of some 20,000 gun laws currently in place and restoring the right to defend oneself and the state by force of arms, if necessary. Article I, Section 21, of the Pennsylvania Constitution sums up the Founding Fathers' ideas on arms in one simple, succinct and exact sentence. The wording cannot be misconstrued, misread or otherwise toyed with for the purpose of denying our right to keep and bear arms. To those who would contend that document is dated, or has otherwise not stood the test of time, I disagree. Here is that section:

Right to Bear Arms

Section 21.

The right of the citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the State shall not be questioned.

 

JOHN DeLALLO
Bethel Park

 

 

The writer is a retired Air Force master sergeant, a certified firearms instructor and a Second Amendment activist.

 

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