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Your meat, your health care

Written by Diana Nelson Jones on .

groundmeat
We have so much to look forward to in the coming days: tomorrow’s Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act and Holy Grill Day next Wednesday.

Public relations people are pummeling us with “did you know?” tidbits that relate to both. The White House obviously is coming in ahead of any high court decision, adverse or otherwise, with some trumpet music that might make the popular charts.

Here’s a distillation of how the White House says the health care law is already benefitting Pennsylvanians.

On its heels is an admonition from the people at foodsafety.gov.

Even if no one else does, I see the way the two links can both be used in the same blog post. (That's salmonella on the right, a salmonella_1parasite on the left.) One is about celebrating new, better health coverage and the other makes sure we know where better health starts. On our loudest and most carnivorous off-day of the year, it starts in your kitchen, Bub. I say Bub because it’s generally the guys who commandeer the grill — often at the parasitesrisk of nuancing meat outcomes, i.e., pink enough to merit consumption.

It doesn’t hurt to remind people over and over and over, I guess, that pink meat can be safe. A meat thermometer is a great tool. Actually, hey, it’s a gadget! Even better. The site above tells you about safe minimum meat temperatures and how you can avoid letting bacteria, viruses and parasites ruin your 4th.

No one wants to go to the hospital unless he has a job there. Even to see a sick relative or friend, the trip is one to be dreaded. First of all, your friend/family member is in the hospital, which is a bummer at best, and then there’s the chance you can actually get something by being in a hospital and have to be admitted yourself. But it's really awful to be dragged there because you’ve heaved yourself dry and dehydrated, and that’s not the worst food-poisoning scenario by a long shot.chickenleg

So read up on what you’re planning to do with food on Independence Day, even if you have done it umpteen times without a clue that your burgers and chicken legs should be a certain temperature before you consume them.

It's a good habit to get into, not knowing what affordable care might mean in the future.

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