Print

About the Blue Jackets - Game 4 - 04-23-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

A preview of the Blue Jackets.

When and where: 7 p.m., EDT. Nationwide Arena.

TV: Root Sports (Pittsburgh market), Fox Sports Ohio (Columbus market), NBC Sports Network (Rest of the United States), CBC, RDS.

Leading postseason scorer: Jack Johnson, 4 points (3 goals, 1 assist).

Last Game: 4-3 home loss in Game 3. Brandon Dubinsky had two assists for the Blue Jackets.

Probable goaltenders: Marc-Andre Fleury (2-1, 2.98 GAA, .899 SV%) for the Penguins. Sergei Bobrovsky (1-2, 3.32 GAA, .904 SV%) for the Blue Jackets.

Injuries: For the Penguins, center Brian Gibbons (suspected shoulder) is doubtful. Center Marcel Goc (ankle) and goaltender Tomas Vokoun (blood clot) are out. Right winger Pascal Dupuis (knee) are on injured reserve. For the Blue Jackets, right winger Nathan Horton (abdominal) and defenseman Fedor Tyutin are out.

Potential lines and defensive pairings: The Penguins primary lines and defensive pairings at today's morning skate were:

14 Chris Kunitz - 87 Sidney Crosby -22 Lee Stempniak
36 Jussi Jokinen - 71 Evgeni Malkin - 18 James Neal
59 Jayson Megna - 16 Brandon Sutter - 19 Beau Bennett
15 Tanner Glass - 46 Joe Vitale - 27 Craig Adams

7 Paul Martin - 44 Brooks Orpik
4 Rob Scuderi - 58 Kris Letang
2 Matt Niskanen - 3 Olli Maatta

-The Blue Jackets primary lines and defensive pairings at today's morning skate were:

38 Boone Jenner - 19 Ryan Johansen - 5 Jack Skille
11 Matt Calvert - 17 Brandon Dubinsky - 13 Cam Atkinson
18 R.J. Umberger - 42 Artem Anisimov - 71 Nick Foligno
 26 Derek MacKenzie - 55 Mark Letestu - 14 Blake Comeau

58 David Savard - 7 Jack Johnson
27 Ryan Murray - 21 James Wisniewski (above)
6 Nikita Nikitin - 47 Dalton Prout

Notes:

-The last time the Penguins played this Blue Jackets, this happened:

-Right winger Chris Conner (foot) was activated from injured reserve.

-Gibbons did not participate in the morning skate. Goc did.

-"It's fun to have those expectations." - Lee Stempniak on being part of a Stanley Cup contending team.

-Tyutin did not participate in the morning skate.

-The referees are Gord Dwyer (No. 19) and Dan O'Halloran (No. 13). The linesmen are Bryan Pancich (No. 94) and Jay Sharrers (No. 57).

-Our live blog, direct from the capital of the Buckeye State, begins at approximately 6 p.m. Please tune in.

(Photo: John Grieshop/Getty Images)

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

CineGrille -- film and food -- opens at Latitude in North Fayette

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

 

cinegrilleblog1
 
blogmenubv423A breathy Marilyn Monroe and screening of “The Dark Knight Rises” helped to mark the grand opening of CineGrille in North Fayette today.
 
It’s an 85-seat movie theater with wait staff serving food and beverages to patrons at their seats at Latitude 40. 
 
The entertainment center at The Pointe at North Fayette had a soft opening for the theater in January but cut the ribbon today with invited guests, a Marilyn lookalike, popcorn, candy and fancier food, and projection of the climactic, Pittsburgh-centric finale of the Batman movie. 
 
The full movie was going to screen afterward, with “The Lego Movie” scheduled to open Thursday. 
 
The film looked and sounded great, and the seats are comfy with small trays that slide 90 degrees to serve as a small table and reveal a cup holder. Carlene Gnazzo, vice president of sales and marketing for the venue, calls it “La-Z-Boy seating with tableside service, minus the remotes.”
 
The chairs are in clusters of five with plenty of leg room and access to the aisles for waiters or waitresses to bring food such as margherita pizza or tacos or grilled buffalo wings. The alcohol menu includes martinis, margaritas, wine and beer. 
 
CineGrille shows second-run movies (roughly six to eight weeks after release), with the “Frozen” sing-along a recent popular pick for children and adults.  It’s all digital projection and sound, with 3-D capability and a screen measuring 25 feet by 11 feet. 
 
Regular admission is $8 but the complex also is pitching the space for corporate or social events along with birthday parties for children and adults. 
 
Details are available at www.Latitude360.com but parents can buy blocks of tickets or opt for the CineGrille birthday package, $21.99 each. That gives early access to the theater 11 a.m. to noon, with one movie ticket per guest, unlimited soda and popcorn, one-topping pizza, two adult tickets per package and a birthday invitation template.
 
Latitude, with 65,000 square feet, has all sorts of entertainment options, from a bowling alley and live performance space to a restaurant and sports bar. It’s located  at 200 Quinn Drive not far from the Walmart. 
 
The complex is in the process of transitioning from Latitude 40 to Latitude 360. The Pittsburgh location opened in November 2012 and is part of a national chain based in Jacksonville, Fla. 
cineblog2
 
Photos by Barbara Vancheri, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Stempniak: 'It’s fun to have those expectations' - 04-23-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

 

If any one player is emblematic of how the Penguins roller coaster of a first-round series has gone, it's Lee Stempniak.

In the first overtime period of Game 2 Saturday, Stempniak had a chance off a rebound to score a would-be game-trying goal but failed to get a clean shot off. The Blue Jackets scored in the second overtime period to claim a 4-3 win.

Monday, with his team trailing 3-2, Stempniak ripped a wrister by Columbus goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky's left shoulder on the near side from the right wing. In between those extremes, Stempniak has worked on the team's first line and the third line. At today's morning skate, he worked on the first line with Sidney Crosby and Chris Kunitz.

Recently, Stempniak talked about his experiences in the series thus far:

You expressed regret on not scoring a goal in overtime of Game 2 off a rebound. What did it feel like to score the game-tying goal in Game 3 in contrast?

"It feels good to finally score in the playoffs. It was my first career goal and to score a goal in a key situation is good. I guess you sort of look at [Game 2] and wish you would have scored it. But I sort of moved on from that already. You have to move on from game to game. It definitely felt great to get that goal but I don’t feel like it’s vindication for what happen in Game 2."

Describe the the non-goal in Game 2.

"It was a good shot from [Sidney Crosby] and the rebound the rebound came to me. Just a bang-bang play. I just tried to get it over his pad to the far side and I think he got his blocker on."

And the goal in Game 3?

"It was a nice pass from Chris [Kunitz]. He made a nice pass to put it through. It was sort of a short two-on-one with Kris Letang on the left side. I looked to see if there was a pass there and I looked him off. I was able to shot short side."

You've played in the playoffs before but not on a team with championship expectations like the Penguins. How new is this for you?

"I’ve only been in the playoffs two times. It’s definitely a different set of expectations being in Pittsburgh. It’s fun to have those expectations and be a team that’s looked at to compete for the Stanley Cup. We’re a team that believes it can win the Stanley Cup. You really enjoy those expectations and the challenge that comes with it. It’s been fun. It’s been a pretty crazy series so far with changes and giving up leads. It’s fun. I can’t wait for Game 4."

You've played on the first and third lines in his series thus far. How much of an adjustment is there in going between lines during games?

"Probably a little bit less than you would think. Obviously with Sid and Chris, they look to score I think off the rush more. They’re great players in the offensive zone on the forecheck, especially Sid. He’s able to beat guys in the corners and behind the net using his strength and skating. Playing, with Brandon [Sutter], …. We’re going to be good defensively, get pucks out and really try to generate offense from working on the cycles, the forecheck and getting bodies to the net. I think the differences in those situations in the playoffs are sort of minimized. Whatever line you’re one, first line to fourth line, everyone is looking to get pucks to net, bodies to the net and score goals that way. I think it’s less of an adjustment than most people think."

(Photo: Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

A call to conscience for gentrifiers

Written by Diana Nelson Jones on .

 

 
 
Daniel Hertz, writing in the Atlantic Cities today, provides an excellent work of thought-food for those who talk about gentrification as if it is either a good thing or a bad thing.
 
It is, he writes, inevitable whether you move your educated, moneyed self to a poor neighborhood or a rich neighborhood.
 
If you move to Larimer, say, your income and its strength will encourage others with the same buying power to move near you and then the cafe tables will sprout on sidewalks like wild daisies. If you move to Upper St. Clair, you are strengthening the wall of income exclusivity.
 
In “There’s Basically No Way Not to Be a Gentrifier,” he writes of his young, educated and progressive cohort:
 
“We have a lot of conversations about whether or not it’s acceptable to live in our current neighborhood, or the one we’d like to live in. Sometimes, we reassure ourselves by discussing the obviously graver transgressions of the people who live in some other neighborhood, which has accumulated slightly more bougie coffee shops and restaurants.
 
"Sometimes we find solace in some part of the continuum of gentrification that we’re comfortable with: the very beginning, when you can kid yourself that your presence isn’t changing anything; or when the tipping point has tipped, and the damage has already been done.
 
“The upshot here is not that we should all descend into nihilistic real estate hedonism. But we need to recognize what’s really going on: that what we call gentrification these days is only one facet of the much larger issue of economic segregation.” 
 
It results from a system that does not protect people who were there before the market forces begin to flex their muscle, and you can reach further back, he writes, to “generations of rotten and racist urban policies, that makes economic segregation so widespread and pernicious. It also explains why it’s growing so quickly – faster, even, than economic inequality.”
 
People early to the momentum of gentrification have a responsibility beyond being considerate and socially inclusive of neighbors who do not have their market oomph, he writes, and that is “to be aware of these underlying systemic processes and use what social and political power you have to change them: lobbying your local government for housing subsidies for the low-income, protections against eviction due to rising rents, and an end to exclusionary caps on housing construction that keep prices artificially high.”
 
Walkabout might add that this responsibility depends on respect for the common good and for those whose economic setbacks could force them out of the home and neighborhood they have cherished, sometimes all their lives.
 

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Details of PSO's upcoming Wilkinsburg Community Concert

Written by Elizabeth Bloom on .

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will perform its community concert at Wilkinsburg High School on May 16. Details of the performance have been released. From the PSO:

PITTSBURGH – The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents the 11th Annual Community Engagement Concert for the community of Wilkinsburg on Friday, May 16 at 7 p.m. at Wilkinsburg High School. All proceeds from tickets sales directly benefit the music programs in the Wilkinsburg School District. More than $60,000 has been raised in Wilkinsburg through the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's Community Engagement concerts.

Resident Conductor Fawzi Haimor will lead the symphony in an exciting program filled with Beethoven, Bernstein, Copland, Sousa and more! A very special performance of "Take Time in Life" will feature students from the Wilkinsburg School District and Pittsburgh Obama High School. Additionally, Pittsburgh Symphony trumpet Chad Winkler will perform Haydn's Concerto in E-flat major, and vocalist Katy Williams will perform Dvorak's "Songs My Mother Taught Me" and the classic "Over the Rainbow" with the symphony. The Pittsburgh Symphony will finish with a patriotic burst of John Phillip Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever."

Tickets are $5 for students K-12 and $10 for adults. A group of 10 adult tickets is available for a discounted price of $75. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Wilkinsburg High School Music Department at 412-871-2282 or 412-371-9504 x 2717, and will also be available at the door on the night of the concert.

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.