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"Game of Thrones" Jack Gleeson talks shop in Pittsburgh

Written by Maria Sciullo on .

 

About the only mean thing Jack Gleeson (aka King Joffrey on HBO's "Game of Thrones") did during a meet-and-greet at the Waterfront Barnes & Noble this afternoon was deface his own visage on a promotional poster.

Gleeson, in town for the annual fundraiser for Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre Oct. 28, happily scribbled a mustache over his photo in silver Sharpie, also filling in the eyes to give them a wicked look, and wrote "J" on one cheek, "G" on the other.

This is the guy who ordered the execution of Ned Stark??

In truth, Gleeson, 21, seemed a bit shy but was game to discuss his character with fans over the course of an hour-long session. He also talked about some of the actors whose careers he admires -- from Cillian Murphy, whom he met while playing a sacred little kid in "Batman Begins" -- to Daniel Day-Lewis ("I know, it's kind of a cliche answer"), to Mark Rylance, Tony and Olivier award-winning actor who has graced the Pittsburgh stage on occasion and currently is on Broadway with no one, but two Shakespearean plays.

He said he's also inspired by Joaquin Phoenix. It is a coincidence that Phoenix's character in "Gladiator" is akin to Joffrey in many ways, he added.

joffreyThrough Dublin's Gate Theatre, Gleeson has gotten to work with many fine actors, including Domhnall Gleeson (no relation), star of the upcoming "About Time". The latter's father is actor Brendan Gleeson.

Alan Stanford, PICT producing artistic director who is also heavily involved in Gate, said "I've been very lucky, we've had some incredibly talented people either come up through class or be involved in one of our [Gate] productions.

Among them: Pauline McLynn, Gabriel Byrne and Domhnall Gleeson, the last of whom played Herbert Pocket in Gate's "Great Expectations." Jack Gleeson was young Pip in that one.

"Ireland is a small country and Dublin is a tight theater community, like Pittsburgh, and the cream comes to the surface quite quickly," Stanford said.

 

 

 

 

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'Game of Thrones' King Joffrey will greet subjects at Pittsburgh's Waterfront Sunday

Written by Maria Sciullo on .

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If, as they say, playing the villain is much more fun than being the good guy, then Jack Gleeson must be having a grand time.

The young "Game of Thrones" actor, who plays the most hated man in Westeros -- or pretty much any land in the television universe -- will be doing a meet-and-greet October 27 at the Waterfront Barnes & Noble in Pittsburgh.

Think of it as King Joffrey Baratheon visiting the common folk at Kings Landing, if indeed Kings Landing had a Starbucks. Gleeson, by all reports a very smart and funny guy (check out this Q&A he did recently at a Dublin university), will be chatting with fans and might even sign GOT merch purchased at the store.

Gleeson is making the trip from his native Ireland to headline an October 28 gala for Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre (PICT). The annual fundraiser -- PICT Plays... with Mystery and Mayhem -- is at J. Verno Studios on the South Side.

PICT producing artistic director Alan Stanford and Gleeson go way back, with Stanford casting him as "the most heart-rending Tiny Tim" years ago in Gate Theatre Dublin's production of "A Christmas Carol."

Now Gleeson is all grown up and playing a sadistic twerp of a king who likes to use crossbows in terrible ways. We'd say 'Bah, humbug,' but when Joffrey's on screen, you just can't look away.

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'Doctor Who' 50th anniversary special includes 3D screenings in Pittsburgh's Waterfront movie theater

Written by Sharon Eberson on .

 

DocWhoPoster2013My fellow Whovian and colleague Liz said, "I guess I'll be going to D.C. ..." when she first saw the BBC America announcement that the "Doctor Who"  50th anniversary special, "Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor," will be show in 3D in theaters on Nov. 23 and 25. The press release didn't include a Pittsburgh site, but the Fathom Events website did: the AMC Loews at the Waterfront in Homestead. 

The press release says:

In association with AMC Entertainment Inc., Cinemark Holdings, Inc., and Regal Entertainment Group, BBC AMERICA makes history by honoring eleven Doctors on Saturday, Nov. 23with a global simulcast 3D screening event in eleven cities at the same time the 75-minute Anniversary special premieres on BBC AMERICA and across the globe. Tickets for the Saturday, Nov. 23 screenings will go on sale Oct. 25 at 9 a.m. for theater locations in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Seattle, Washington D.C., San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and Minneapolis. Tickets may be purchased at Cinemark.com and www.fathomevents.com. For a complete list of theater locations and prices, visit the NCM Fathom Events website (theaters and participants are subject to change). The event will be broadcast via the new digital cinema projection systems.

In addition to Matt Smith, the 50th Anniversary special also stars former Time Lord David Tennant and Jenna Coleman with Billie Piper and John Hurt. The theatrical events will include specially shot introductions and "The Day of The Doctor: Behind The Lens," a 10 minute behind-the-scene featurette directly following the special that also will be available the same day at http://www.bbc.co.uk/Doctorwho. The short features Matt Smith, David Tennant and Jenna Coleman with Billie Piper and John Hurt, as well as lead writer and executive producer Steven Moffat, discussing their 50th Anniversary experiences.

 

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'Calvin and Hobbes' documentary features ToonSeum's Joe Wos

Written by Sharon Eberson on .

A new trailer for the documentary "Dear Mr. Watterson," about the shy creator of the beloved comic-strip "Calvin and Hobbes," features ToonSeum chief Joe Wos. The's the first person you see in the latest trailer for the documentary, which is having success as it makes the festival rounds and pros and fans pay tribute to the strip and its creator.

During the National Cartoonists Society convention in Pittsburgh in May, Jean Schulz, widow of "Peanuts'" creator Charles Schulz and president of the Board of Directors at the Charles M. Schulz Museum, loaned an original "Calvin and Hobbes" print to the Pittsburgh museum for an unprecedented exhibition of works by Reuben Award winners.

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Pittsburgh is for movie lovers

Written by Sharon Eberson on .

If you love movies, then Pittsburgh is an ideal spot to put down roots — so says the Movoto blog, dedicated to "the lighter side of real estate."
In a thorough look at 100 of most populous cities in the United States, Pittsburgh came in No. 5 for Best U.S. Cities for Movie Lovers. The top 10 were:


1. Portland.
2. San Francisco
3. Atlanta
4. Las Vegas
5. Pittsburgh
6. Minneapolis
7. Rochester, N.Y.
8. Orlando
9. Seattle
10. Cincinnati


These were no random picks. Writer Natalie Grigson used eight criteria for her picks:

  • Movie theaters per capita
  • Video rental stores per capita
  • Number of indie theaters per capita
  • Number of annual film festivals
  • Number of film/cinema museums
  • Number of film societies per capita
  • Number of drive-in theaters per capita
  • Bonus points for specialty theaters per capita

Each city was ranked from 1 to 100 based on these criteria, with 1 being the best and 100 being the worst for movie lovers. The results were then totaled, averaged, ranked, weighed (more weight was given to number of specialty theaters, for example).

Data was sourced from the review site Yelp (movie theaters, video stores, indie theaters, and film museums, for instance), plus websites such as Wikipedia, the Alamo Drafthouse site and Google. Among the data collected, the top city for movie theaters per capita was San Francisco, closely followed by Atlanta and Cincinnati. In last place was Toledo, Ohio, with two movie theaters for a population of more than 280,000.

According to the site, Pittsburgh was No. 2 in the category of “film societies,” in which cities were favored for having “one to two film societies for their relatively smaller city sizes,” although it didn’t name them. L.A. was a leader with seven. The 34 drive-ins and specialty theaters seems steep.
Portland, Ore., made it to No. 1 with five film fests per year, a film museum, multiple film societies, tons of movie theaters, indie theaters, a drive-in theater and the unique Kennedy School movie theater.

ChartMovieLovers2013

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