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Karvel Anderson named an AP honorable mention All-American

Written by Craig Meyer on .

Robert Morris guard Karvel Anderson was named an Associated Press honorable mention All-American Monday.

A senior, Anderson averaged a team-high 19.7 points per game, a scoring mark which helped him win the Northeast Conference player of the year award. In the process, he helped lead the Colonials to the NEC regular season title and a second round appearance in the National Invitation Tournament.

Anderson is just the third player in Robert Morris history to be named an AP honorable mention All-American and the first since Tony Lee in 2009.

 

Craig Meyer: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  and Twitter @CraigMeyerPG

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Stage AE updates: CHVRCHES, 311, Jurassic 5 and more

Written by Scott Mervis on .

 

CHVRCHESCHVRCHESStage AE has unleashed a constant barrage of concert announcements on Monday morning, with acts coming in all flavors, from the pop-rock R5 to the hip-hop Jurassic 5 to jam faves Yonder Mountain String Band.

May 29: R5. $25 advance/$30 day of show. Indoors. On sale April 4.

June 11: CHVRCHES. $22/$25. On sale April 4

June 18: O.A.R. & Phillip Phillips. $39.50 Advance/$42.00 Day of Show. On sale April 11.

July 9: Yonder Mountain String Band and Railroad Earth. $25.00 Advance/$30.00 Day of Show. On sale: April 11.

July 14: 311 and Sublime with Rome. $39.50/$42. On sale April 4

July 30: Word of Mouth Reunion Tour with Jurassic 5, Dilated Peoples and Beat Junkies. $25. On sale April 4

 

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Avenged Sevenfold, Korn headine Mayhem Festival at First Niagara Pavilion

Written by Scott Mervis on .

 

avenged-sevenfold-2013Avenged Sevenfold and Korn will be the heavy hitters atop the seventh annual Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival tour, hitting the First Niagara Pavilion on July 26.

Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. April 4. The "GET OFF YOUR ASS" ticket special for the first 72 hours is all lawn tickets $20 and $5 off reserved. (www.livenation.com)

The festival features bands on four stages, including the return of rapper Ice-T's Body Count and Suicide Silence fronted by All Shall Perish's Hernan "Eddie" Hermida (replacing singer Mitch Lucker, who died in a motorcycle accident).

ROCKSTAR ENERGY DRINK MAIN STAGE:

Avenged Sevenfold

Korn

Asking Alexandria

Trivium

COLDCOCK AMERICAN HERBAL WHISKEY STAGE:

Cannibal Corpse

Suicide Silence

Miss May I

Mushroomhead

Texas Hippie Coalition

King 810

THE SUMERIAN RECORDS/HEADBANG FOR THE HIGHWAY STAGE:

Body Count featuring Ice-T

Upon A Burning Body*

Veil of Maya*

Darkest Hour*

Headbang Local Winner

THE VICTORY RECORDS STAGE:

Emmure

Ill Nino

Wretched

Islander

Erimha

*bands rotating slots

 

 

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Pittsburgh Festival of New Music details

Written by Elizabeth Bloom on .

Over the summer, I wrote about the Pittsburgh Festival of New Music. Well, details of the festival have been announced, and it looks like an awesome few days of new-music-making. Check out details of the festival below, from the press release: 

Festival of New Music to transform Pittsburgh's soundscape May 22-25

Alia Musica Pittsburgh presents The Pittsburgh Festival of New Music, four days of public events spanning a wide range of contemporary chamber music, May 22-25. Framed by two unique musical events happening in unconventional venues throughout the city, the Festival includes performances by Pittsburgh's most active new music organizations, artists of national and international renown, and guests hailing from Chicago, New York, Michigan, and Houston.

May 22: Perfect Lives by Robert Ashley
Miniature operas staged in everyday locations

On March 22, New York collective Varispeed presents its acclaimed arrangement of Robert Ashley's seminal work Perfect Lives, a daylong crawling concert installed in sites throughout the city. As performers and audience members journey from location to location — a park, a bank, a church, a backyard — participants imagine a folksy, Midwestern town where the bank tellers know the captain of the football team, and everyone drinks together at the end of the night.

Originally conceived as a 7-episode TV opera, Perfect Lives debuted on the BBC in 1986. The piece weaves together overlapping subplots: an unspoken crime, an elopement, and the mischief of two itinerant musicians. Ashley, the composer of what Fanfare has called "nothing less than the first American opera," died in NYC in 2014. "He would have been 84 at the end of the month," says David Ruder of Varispeed. "He was a great guy and we miss him already. Doing Perfect Lives in Pittsburgh is going to have an additional level of catharsis & meaning."

May 24: Rzewski plays Rzewski
The composer/pianist performs a rare program of his own works
New Hazlett Theater, 7:30pm

American maverick composer and pianist Frederic Rzewski has made his home in Brussels since the 1970s. Now 76, his appearances in the US are less and less frequent. Compared by turns to legendary pianist Glenn Gould and blacklisted folk singer Pete Seeger, Rzewski's works are often anarchic, sometimes satirical, and always powerfully virtuosic.

Rzewski's first-ever performance in Pittsburgh is long overdue, as he has Pittsburgh ties -- his two sons, Daniel and Alexis, live here. "When I was talking to him during his last visit," says Federico Garcia-De Castro, director of Alia Musica, "and mentioned our plans for the Festival, he realized, right then and there, that he actually had never played in Pittsburgh before. I knew that I had to take the chance." See this not-to-be-missed performance at the New Hazlett Theater on Saturday, May 24, 2014, at 7:30pm.

May 25: Inuksuit by John Luther Adams
Drums, gongs, and glockenspiels transform Lake Elizabeth Park, 2pm

Scores of musicians converge on Lake Elizabeth Park in Pittsburgh's North Side to perform Inuksuit, by John Luther Adams, 2012 receipient of the Heinz Award. Inuksuit is meant to be played by 99 musicians dispersed in a large outdoor area, using an incredible array of instruments including conch shells, air raid sirens, gongs, bells, shakers, drums, cymbals, and glockenspiels.

Inuksuit is the ultimate environmental piece, designed to heighten our awareness of the sights and sounds that surround us every day and to energize our experience of our own environment. The work, "a sonic and scenic glory almost beyond description" according to critic Alex Ross, has been performed around the world — in Melbourne, Toronto, Chicago, Berkeley, Lisbon, the Hague, and Belo Horizonte, Brazil — and was recognized among the most memorable performances of 2011 in New York City by The New Yorker, Time Out New York, and New York Magazine.

May 24: The Pittsburgh Soundpike
The pay-as-you-exit event that encourages discovery
New Hazlett Theater, 2pm

Pittsburgh's lively new music scene has a dedicated place in the Festival, as the most active local organizations join forces in a marathon concert dubbed The Pittsburgh Soundpike. Groups include Trillium Ensemble, the Black Orchid String Trio, Directions Duo, the Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra (ELCO), and features a performance of Steve Reich's monumental Different Trains by the Freya String Quartet. "We wanted to create an ideal setting for audience cross-over and mutual discovery," says Garcia-De Castro about the novel marathon concept where listeners pay for their tickets as they exit the performance, and the price depends inversely on the length of their stay—the more groups they hear, the less they will pay.

Additional Programs
Alia Musica Pittsburgh and the Bugallo-Williams Duo

Also at the New Hazlett, the festival presents the Bugallo-Williams Piano Duo (Thursday, May 22). Consisting of Pitt professor Amy Williams and Argentinean pianist Helena Bugallo, the duo made a place for themselves as the foremost interpreters of Conlon Nancarrow's music, and have recently turned to the piano-duo music of Gyorgy Kurtág. Their Festival performance also includes music by Williams herself, Garcia-De Castro, and more.

On Friday, May 23, Alia Musica Pittsburgh performs Luciano Berio's famous cycle of Folk Songs in its entirety, with New York-based soprano Jamie Jordan. The ensemble, entering its eighth year of performances, also presents music by University of Pittsburgh professor Eric Moe, CMU and Pitt graduate Matthew Heap, and Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas.

Major support for the Festival comes from The Heinz Endowments and The Pittsburgh Foundation. Other partners include the Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts, the Sprout Fund, and Music on the Edge. Outdoor events are produced in partnership with the Office of Public Art, the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, and James Simon's Sculpture Studio. The City Paper is media sponsor of the Pittsburgh Festival of New Music.

Schedule
Thursday May 22, Perfect Lives (Varispeed), episodes at 11am, 1pm, 3pm, 5pm, 7pm, 9pm, 11pm. Starting at Market Square, venues across the city. Free.

Thursday May 22, 7:30pm: Bugallo-Williams piano duo. New Hazlett Theater. $10. Music by Kurtág, Williams, Garcia-De Castro, and more.

Friday May 23, 7:30pm: Alia Musica Pittsburgh. New Hazlett Theater. $15. Music by Berio, Heap, Moe, and Haas. Featuring Jamie Jordan, soprano, and Houston's Duo Scordatura.

Saturday May 24, 2pm: Pittsburgh Soundpike featuring Steve Reich's Different Trains (Freya String Quartet), plus performances by Trillium Ensemble, Black Orchid String Trio, Directions Duo, ELCO, Alia Musica, and members from the CMU Contemporary Ensemble.

Saturday May 24, 7:30pm: Rzweski plays Rzewski. New Hazlett Theater. $15.

Sunday May 25, 2pm: Inuksuit by John Luther Adams. Lake Elizabeth Park. Free.

Sunday May 27, 5pm: Guests' Concert: Duo Scordatura (Houston), Clocks in Motion (Michigan). New Hazlett Theater. Free.

Tickets
Bugallo-Williams: $15
Alia Musica Pittsburgh: $15
Rzewski plays Rzewski: $15
Pittsburgh Soundpike: $5-$15
Two-event pass: $20
Full festival pass: $40

Tickets will be available online starting April 10th.

Details
pghnewmusic.com
alia-musica.org
412 361 0194

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Filling in at the last minute

Written by Elizabeth Bloom on .

Happy Opening Day! In baseball, there are often last-minute shuffles to the lineup, and athletes need to step up their game in replacing stars. It's true of classical music, too; one of the genre's most enduring traditions is late substitutions. When Bruno Walter withdrew from a New York Philharmonic concert, he helped launch a young Leonard Bernstein's conducting career. When tenor Vladimir Kuzmenko fell ill during a Pittsburgh Opera performance of "Aida" in 2008, music director Antony Walker sang the role of Radames instead, even while he was still conducting. (Mr. Kuzmenko lip-synched from the stage.) 

This past weekend continued that illustrious tradition. Tenor Eric Barry took on a few extra performances of "La Boheme," another Pittsburgh Opera production. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra music director Manfred Honeck filled in at the last minute for an ailing Gustavo Dudamel to lead the New York Philharmonic in works by Claude Vivier and Bruckner. His performance received a rave review from New York Times critic Anthony Tommasini. Props to all, and happy opening day!

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