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Vacation post - 08-25-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

-Happy 45th birthday to former Penguins forward Jamie Leach (right). A third-round pick in 1987, Leach, the son of former Flyers star Reggie Leach, spent parts of four seasons with the Penguins. As a rookie in 1989-90, Leach appeared in 10 games and recorded three assists. In 1990-91, Leach played in seven games,  netted two goals and earned a Stanley Cup ring despite not appearing in a playoff game. Leach would reach career-highs in games (38) and points (nine) and had his named carved into the Stanley Cup for the team's second consecutive championships. After five games and no points in 1992-93, Leach was claimed off waivers by the Hartford Whalers early in the season. In 60 games with the Penguins, Leach recorded 14 points.

-Happy 53rd birthday to former Penguins forward Dave Tippett. A free agent signing in the 1992 offseason, Tippett spent one season with the Penguins. In 1992-93, Tippett appeared in 74 games and recorded 25 points. He appeared in all 12 of the team's postseason games and contributed five points. In the 1993 offseason, he joined the rival Flyers as a free agent. He is currently the head coach of the Coyotes.

-Happy 31st birthday to former Penguins forward Connor James. A free agent signing in the 2006 offseason, James spent parts of two seasons with the Penguins. In 2007-08, James, who had a bad habit of pretty much getting smashed by opposing defenders (below), appeared in 13 games and netted one goal. James was limited to one game and no point in 2008-09. In the 2009 offseason, he joined Augsburg of Germany's DEL. In 14 games with the Penguins, he scored one goal. James is currently a member of the Nürnberg Ice Tigers in Germany.

(Photo: Penguins Hockey Cards)

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Amish Mafia

Written by Rob Rogers on .

Governor Corbett is demanding that the Discovery Channel end its reality show about Pennsylvania's Amish community. I wish he felt so protective about the state's environment. 

082514 Amish Mafia

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Guardians of the Galaxy rockets to top summer spot

Written by Barbara Vancheri on .

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Riding good word of mouth, “Guardians of the Galaxy” held onto the top spot at the box office with an estimated $17.6 million. With more than $250 million in North America, it becomes the highest grossing movie of the 2014 summer, nudging aside “Transformers: Age of Extinction.”
 
That’s quite a feat for a movie revolving around, as our reviewer put it, third- or fourth-tier Marvel characters. But it’s solidly entertaining with Chris Pratt as a likable Everyman hero. 
 
Here are the early numbers from Rentrak.com:
 
 
1. “Guardians of the Galaxy” — $17,631,000, for $251,884,857 since its early August release. 
2. “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” — $16,800,000, bringing its running total to $145,609,806 so far. 
3. “If I Stay” — $16,355,000.
4. “Let’s Be Cops” — $11,000,000, or $45,246,168 since release. 
5. “When the Game Stands Tall” — $9,100,000.
6. “The Giver” — $6,730,000, for $24,100,538 so far. 
7. “The Expendables 3” — $6,600,000 or $27,518,177 to date. 
8. “Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” — $6,477,000.
9. “The Hundred-Foot Journey” — $5,562,000, for $32,750,000. 
10. “Into the Storm” — $3,800,000, or $38,301,384 so far. 
 
Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Rentrak, calls “If I Stay,” starring Chloe Grace Moretz as a teenager caught between life and death after a terrible car accident with her family, “yet another example of a profitable female-centric film this summer,” and a crowd-pleaser based on exit surveys. 
 
The summer movie season will end on Labor Day. 
 

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Vacation post - 08-24-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

-Happy 42nd birthday to former Penguins defenseman Ian Moran (right). A sixth-round pick in 1990, Moran spent parts of eight seasons with the Penguins. Moran made his NHL debut in the 1995 postseason by appearing in eight games and failed to record a point. As a true rookie in 1995-96, Moran played in 51 games and scored two points. Despite being limited to 36 games in 1996-97, Moran increased his production by recording nine points. In the 1997 playoffs, Moran appeared in five games and recorded three points, including the primary assist on Mario Lemieux's "last" home postseason goal in a 4-1 win against the Flyers in Game 4 of an Eastern Conference quarterfinal (below). Moran was once again limited to 37 games in 1997-98 due to a knee injury and produced seven points. In the 1998 postseason, he appeared in six contests and was held without a point. In 1998-99, Moran played in 62 games and scored nine points. During the 1999 playoffs, Moran saw action 13 games and contributed two assists. The 1999-2000 season saw Moran set career-highs in games (73) and points (12). In that spring's postseason, Moran appeared in 11 games and recorded one assist. A hand injury limited Moran to 40 games and seven assists in 2000-01. He appeared in all 18 of the team's postseason games that season and contributed one assist. He rebounded in 2001-02 by playing in 64 games and netted 10 points. After 70 games and seven assists in 2002-03, Moran was dealt at the trade deadline to the Bruins in exchange for a draft pick. One of six Ohio natives to play for the Penguins (Ab DeMarco, Brian Holzinger, Moe Mantha, Mike Rupp and Bryan Smolinksi are the others.), Moran appeared in 433 games for the Penguins, 18th-most in franchise history, and produced 63 points. In 61 postseason games, he scored seven points.

-Happy 47th birthday to former Penguins forward Ken Priestlay. Acquired late in the 1990-91 season, Priestlay spent parts of two seasons with the Penguins. He appeared in two games for the Penguins in 1990-91, recorded one assist and collected a Stanley Cup run that spring despite not appearing in a playoff game. In 1991-92, Priestlay played in 49 games, scored 10 points and had his named engraved on the Stanley Cup for the team's second consecutive championship. After spending the entire 1992-93 season with the Cleveland Lumberjacks, the Penguins' IHL affiliate, Priestlay was released in the 1993 offseason. In 51 games with the Penguins, Priestlay recorded 11 points.

-Happy 31st birthday to current Penguins forward Marcel Goc. Acquired at last season's trade deadline, Goc, one of three natives of Germany to play for the Penguins (Sven Butenschon and Randy Gilhen are the other two to date), appeared in 12 games and recorded two points. In nine postseason game, he recorded one assist.

(Photo: Steve Babineau/Allsport/Getty Images)

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Pure Evil

Written by Rob Rogers on .

The beheading of James Foley by ISIS was a horrific and barbaric act that played out like a some sort of nightmarish violent video game. Social media and the internet can be great, but it can also provide a way to recruit terrorists. 

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