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More new from Chamber Music Pittsburgh

Written by Elizabeth Bloom on .

ICYMI: The artist formerly known as the Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society has changed its name to Chamber Music Pittsburgh. Get the scoop here about the new brand and the decline of the word "society" at classical music organizations. I had a lot of fun reporting for the piece and learning about the quirky reasons that organizations have taken on or or dropped the word "society" from their names, from the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (which was the "Pittsburgh Symphony Society" in an effort to skirt Pennsylvania's blue laws) to the New York Philharmonic (whose re-branding coincided with having a Mad Man on the orchestra's board). 

In addition to the new name, Chamber Music Pittsburgh has announced its upcoming season. Check out the schedule and additional information from the press release below. Subscriptions are $165-$200, $60 for students, at 412-624-4129 or www.chambermusicpittsburgh.org

 The season will open Monday, September 29, 2014 with one of the world's great string quartets, the Takács Quartet. They will perform Haydn's Quartet in Bb major, Op. 64, No. 3, Debussy's Quartet in G minor, Op. 10, and Beethoven's Quartet in Bb major, Op. 130, with Finale: Grosse Fuge, Op. 133.

On Monday, November 10, 2014, the Pacifica Quartet, a favorite of Pittsburgh audiences, will perform a program of Ligeti's Quartet No. 1 "Metamorphoses nocturnes" and Ravel's Quartet in F major. The Quartet will be joined by violist David Harding for Mozart's Viola Quintet in G minor, K. 516. David Harding is associate professor of viola at Carnegie Mellon University, and has an extensive career in solo and chamber music performance.

On Monday, February 16, 2015, the young and dynamic Jerusalem Quartet will perform a program of Haydn's Quartet in G minor, Op. 74, No. 3 "Rider", Schulhoff's Five Pieces, and Schumann's Quartet in A major, Op. 41, No. 3. "Passion, precision, warmth, a gold blend: these are the trademarks of this excellent Israeli string quartet." –The Times

On Monday, March 16, 2015, cellist Zuill Bailey will perform a recital, accompanied by pianist Awadagin Pratt. Bailey will play Stravinsky's Suite Italienne, Brahms' Sonata in D major, Op. 78, Franck's Sonata in A major, as well as a series of short pieces to be announced from the stage. This will be Zuill Bailey and Awadagin Pratt's premiere performance on CMP's series. Awadagin Pratt, born in Pittsburgh, is highly acclaimed for his musical insight and intensely involving performances.

The season will close on Monday, April 27, 2015 with the Brentano Quartet performing Charpentier's Suite in D minor and James MacMillan's String Quartet No. 3. The Quartet will be joined by clarinetist Todd Palmer to end the concert with Brahms' Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115. The Brentano Quartet has been called "passionate, uninhibited and spellbinding," by the London Independent, and the New York Times extols its "luxuriously warm sound [and] yearning lyricism." Todd Palmer is a three time Grammy-nominated artist, he has worked with the many of the world's finest string ensembles and artists.

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Free gardening talk with Doug tonight. "The Gardens of London."

Written by Doug Oster on .

blog delphiniums and begoniasI couldn't believe my eyes when I walked into the Great Pavilion. Every plant you could ever imagine was displayed in its peak. From Delphiniums, to clematis to daffodils and everything in between. Photo by Doug Oster

I hope you'll join me tonight at the Whitehall Public Library 7 p.m. for a free garden talk about the gardens of London and the 100th anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show.

Last May I took 23 people from Pittsburgh to London to explore the city and many of the amazing public gardens. We were also treated to the 100th anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show, which was spectacular.

We visited Kew Gardens, Tower of London, Wisely Gardens, Hampton Court Palace and more.

I'll also have some free 'Limbaugh Legacy Potato Top' tomato seeds to give a way. For those interested, I'll also be selling and signing copies of my new book, The Steel City Garden.

You must register to attend this free event, call Debby Rampolla at 412-882-6622 or e-mail at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .'; document.write(''); document.write(addy_text79105); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The library is located at 100 Borough Park Dr, Pittsburgh, PA 15236.

See you tonight!

blog wisley heatherThe National Heather Collection is just one of the things which make Wisely Gardens my favorite. Tonight you can learn why I walked 20 minutes in the rain to see this part of the garden.

 

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Empty Netter Assists - 03-25-14

Written by Seth Rorabaugh on .

Penguins

-Who is the Penguins' third line center? Marcel Goc or Brandon Sutter (above)?

-Dan Bylsma does not like television.

-The Penguins recalled Jayson Megna from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton.

-Jeff Zatkoff became the 28th goaltender in franchise history to record an assist Saturday.

-A Twitter promotion by the Penguins involving James Neal did not go very well.

-Matt Niskanen speaks:

-Happy 59th birthday to former Penguins forward Pat Hughes. Acquired in the 1979 offseason along with Rob Holland in a deal which sent Denis Herron and a draft pick to Montreal, Hughes spent parts of two season with the Penguins. In 1979-80, he appeared in 76 games and scored 32 points. He appeared in five postseason games that spring and failed to score a point. After 58 games and 19 points in 1980-81, Hughes was traded to the Oilers in exchange for Pat Price. In 134 regular season games with the Penguins, he recorded 51 points.

-Happy 44th birthday to former Penguins forward Shawn Antoski. A free agent signing in the 1996 offseason, Antoski's Penguins' career amounted to 13 games and no points in 1996-97. Early int he season, Antoski and Dmitri Mironov were dealt to the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim in exchange for Alex Hicks and Fredrik Olausson. Antoski is one of seven former first-round picks from the 1990 draft who played for the Penguins. The others were Petr Nedved, Jaromir Jagr, Darryl Sydor, John Slaney, Drake Berehowsky and Bryan Smolinski.

-Happy 59th birthday to former Penguins forward Ted Bulley. A free agent signing in the 1983 offseason, Bulley appeared in 26 games for the 1983-84 team and recorded five points. He was released in the 1985 offseason.

-Happy 57th birthday to former Penguins forward Bruce Crowder. Claimed off waivers from the Bruins in the 1984 offseason, Crowder appeared in 26 games for the 1984-85 Penguins and recorded 11 points. He retired in February of that season.

-Happy 50th birthday to former Penguins goaltender Ken Wregget (right). Acquired prior to the 1992 trade deadline in a three-way deal which also brought Rick Tocchet, Kjell Samuelsson and a draft pick from the Flyers and Jeff Chychrun from the Kings while sending Paul Coffey to the Kings and Mark Recchi to the Flyers, Wregget spent parts of seven seasons as a part-time backup/starter in Pittsburgh. He finished 1991-92 by playing in nine games and going 5-3-0 with a 4.15 goals against average and .847 save percentage. He appeared in one playoff game that spring, had no record and sported a 6.00 goals against average and .750 save percentage while helping the franchise win its second consecutive Stanley Cup title. He followed that up in 1992-93 by playing in 25 games, compiling a record of 13-7-3 with a 3.42 goals against average and .887 save percentage. During 1993-94, Wregget saw action in 42 games, went 21-12-7 with a 3.37 goals against average, .893 save percentage and one shutout. With starter Tom Barrasso sidelined in the lockout-shortened 1994-95 season, Wregget took over as the starter. He went 25-9-2, with a 3.21 goals against average and .902 save percentage. His 25 wins led the league. In 11 postseason games that spring, he went 5-6 in 11 games with a 3.00 goals against average, .905 save percentage and one shutout. During 1996-97, Wregget played in 46 games, went 17-17-6 with a 3.24 goals against average, .905 save percentage and two shutouts. During that season's playoffs, he played in nine games, went 7-2 with a 2.30 goals against average and .930 save percentage. His final season in Pittsburgh was 1997-98. Hes saw action in 15 games with a 3-6-2 record, 2.75 goals against average, and .904 save percentage. Wregget appeared in all five of the team's postseason games in 1998 and went 1-4 with a 3.64 goals against average and .915 save percentage. In the 1998 offseason, Wregget and Dave Roche were traded to the Flames in exchange for German Titov and Todd Hlushko. In 212 regular games with the Penguins, Wregget had a record of 104-67-21 with a 3.29 goals against average, .898 save percentage and six shutouts. His win total is third-best in franchise history. In 26 postseason games, Wregget was 13-12 with a 2.93 goals against average, .914 save percentage and one shutout.

-Happy 58th birthday to former Penguins forward Dwight Schofield. Acquired in the 1986 offseason from the Capitals in exchange for cash, Schofield appeared in 26 games for the 1986-87 Penguins and recorded seven points. The following offseason, he signed with the Winnipeg Jets.

-After the Jump: The Bruins keep winn... no wait. They lost. And the Coyotes lose Mike Smith.

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Bishop Zubik: No Common Core in Pittsburgh's Catholic schools

Written by Peter Smith on .

bishop-zubikBishop David Zubik said that Common Core -- the national educational standards that many public and Catholic schools have adopted -- won't be coming to Catholic schools in the Diocese of Pittsburgh.

 

In a March 18 letter, Bishop Zubik weighed in on a debate that has been roiling in educational circles recently.

 

Common Core was put together by representatives of various state, educational and other private organizations, trying to develop standard baselines for what students should be learning nationwide. In addition to critics who say it shoehorns a one-size-fits-all approach to public schools, some in Catholic circles have opposed using standards other than those that start with a Catholic model.

 

Bishop Zubik wrote that even if Pennsylvania were to adopt the Core standards for the public schools, they would not be mandated for parochial ones. 

 

He wrote:

"The Common Core is a set of minimum standards, intended to help public schools with their effort to prepare students for higher education and the workforce. Schools in the Diocese of Pittsburgh have always set higher standards, and we continue to challenge students to exceed those standards. 

 

"A number of parents have raised questions about Common Core-related resource materials that conflict with Catholic teaching and have expressed concern about Common Core requirements to collect and report student data in a way that might violate the privacy of students. Be assured that our Catholic identity is the core of our curriculum. Our Catholic faith guides the selection of all curricula, goals, textbooks and other resources. Furthermore, schools in the Diocese of Pittsburgh do not share data on individual students with any state or federal databases."

At the same time, Bishop Zubik maintained the diocese's cooperation with the National Catholic Educational Association, which has helped other dioceses to implement the Core standards. The association is having a national convention here in Pittsburgh next month, and it has been helping Catholic school systems adapt to the standard. That, Bishop Zubik said, "has no bearing on education in the Diocese of Pittsburgh."

 

U.S. News reports here on Catholic dioceses that are adopting the Common Core. 

"We've always used a secular standard as our academic benchmark," a California Catholic educator said. "Then our job as Catholic educators is to make sure the faith is infused and the Catholic identity of our schools is strong. That's always been something that we've had to do."

 

 

 

 

 

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Putin's War

Written by Rob Rogers on .

I never would've guessed back in 2012 that a ridiculous comment made by Mitt Romney during a debate would come true. I think Putin was watching that debate. 

032514 Putins War

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